General Question Vasectomy vs neutering

Zue10

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Mar 24, 2018
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I am torn between having my Bully Zeus neutred or having him undergo a vasectomy. At the moment he is only 5 months old, so I am just trying to get as much information on the pro’s and con’s of both procedures. Has anyone here had their puppy undergo anyone of these procedures?
 

Cbrugs

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I do neuter and have never had an issue with either of my boys. [MENTION=15310]helsonwheels[/MENTION] can tell you about vasectomy.


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helsonwheels

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I am torn between having my Bully Zeus neutred or having him undergo a vasectomy. At the moment he is only 5 months old, so I am just trying to get as much information on the pro’s and con’s of both procedures. Has anyone here had their puppy undergo anyone of these procedures?

Duke has a vasectomy. I DONT regret it one bit. And I’m pretty sure he’s happy to have his jewels too. :). All my lifetime dogs were intact, one neutered n my GS castration. I always said never again I would go with castrations from my GS temperament issues. (Unless health issues). Duke pees squatting unless he’s against the fence he’ll lift his leg. Once in a while he’ll smell Nyala ‘s butt (like neutered dogs!), but like all female that’s fix, she’ll sit down or I say, leave her n he does. He really doesn’t make a point to go smell her and bother her at all. He doesn’t hump her either. He’s healthy, he’s not lazy, he jumps all over n plays non stop. Not ever vet does vasectomies as it’s not taught in vet classes. You need to make sure your vet has done a few. Ask questions and if you don’t understand, ask again! Duke has his done at 6ish months old. And I would do it again in a heartbeat. If I ever get another female, she’ll get her tubes tide guaranteed. All these theories on cancers, hormones etc etc n it’s better health wise to have you pet neutered, is starting to go out the window these theories as more n more new studies are showing completely the opposite studies. I read a lot before doing my decision n liked what I read.
 

Clermont

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Every cat and dog I've ever owned have been neutered, so I don't really have anything to compare
 
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Zue10

Zue10

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Thank you so much for your advice!:D
 

Lalaloopsie

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Difference between neutering and vasectomy is that in case of neutering you completely cut away male testicles and he doesn’t have anymore 80 percent of his testosterone. That means that typical male behaviour like marking, leg lifting, humping, aggressiveness etc usually stops at all or is significantly reduced. Ability to produce sperm is seized, so dog becomes sterile. As adrenal glands still produce a bit of testosterone (even in females), it’s usually enough for normal life.
In case of vasectomy, only ducts which carry sperm outside are tied. That means, testicles are still there and they produce testosterone. It goes straight into blood, ducts are not involved, so vasectomy takes away only one ability - produce sperm and become a father. All the rest is intact.
So, with all respect to vasectomy, it absolutely cannot produce any effect upon behavioural issues like leg lifting or humping or marking. I think it has almost no significance besides from prevention unwanted puppies. So if you have female dogs or there can be a situation that he is unattended and possibly meet any dog ladies...then go for vasectomy.
Personally I left my male bulldog intact, because so far he didn’t have any behavioural issues. And he cannot be involved into any sexual activity and become a father because first of all he is never left unattended and second he is such a coward, smallest female doggie makes him hide under my skirt:yes:
It’s your decision of course, but first of all, ask yourself what you want to achieve with surgery? Does he hump, mark, excessively lifts leg? Is he aggressive?
There is no thing like a harmless surgery. And now there is a lot of data that early neutering is cause of health issues.
I come from Europe and there common rule is to leave male dogs intact, unless dog shows behavioural problems. Why to make an unnecessary expensive surgery ?
 

Delaney24

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My dog is 6 months and he is not aggressive, but he has problems with humping every dog and person he comes across besides me. The vet and my dog trainer both told me to get him neutered asap otherwise this bad behavior will be too difficult to stop. But then I hear from others it's no guarantee to stop this behavior. I'm undecided.
 

helsonwheels

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My dog is 6 months and he is not aggressive, but he has problems with humping every dog and person he comes across besides me. The vet and my dog trainer both told me to get him neutered asap otherwise this bad behavior will be too difficult to stop. But then I hear from others it's no guarantee to stop this behavior. I'm undecided.

Trust me it’s “not” guarantee he will stop humping. I’ve seen numerous dogs neutered that still humps. I recall being somewhere (gathering) many years ago.....and someone was there with their toddler and this guy’s dog jumped on the little child n started to hump the child. Man the father of the child got up in a flash and gave such a swift kick up the dog’s “behind” n got him really good. Dog sure Yelp! Later on that dog after that swift kick he got...never hump again. I’m not saying to give a good kick but sure needs to be grabbed immediately with a strong grab that is and put to his place. The father that kicked the dog basically was more scared n protected his child as the dog was bigger than the child. I sure would of done the same thing. Especially when it comes to children. Once I went to someone ‘s house n her Yorkie grabbed my leg n started to hump. I swung my leg and this 5lb Yorkie went sliding . Never bothered me after that.
 
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Zue10

Zue10

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Thank you for your response! I found your explanation to be extremely informative and very well thought out, and you made many good points. My Zeus is also supervised around the clock and has little to no interaction with other dogs. Your reply to my post has given me some new insight and I greatly appreciate it.
 

LJJ86

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My 9 month old was neutered at 5 months and it didn't stop his humping.

Puppy trainer believes (and I agree) that in his case it is excitement/dominance humping as he does not hump people/toys/furniture and he is more likely to hump male dogs than female. He just gets so excited with off-leash play he defaults to climbing on top of them and going for it I guess! All we can do it the moment is keep taking him away and giving time outs for play-humping.
 

Texas Carol

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Good for you to educate yourself and gather personal experience from others.

Excellent responses given to you for consideration of Zeus best health.

I left my males intact and if you do neuter try to wait until physical maturity.
This varies in different breeds, this way they get full health benefits of hormones
and full development of bone, etc. Bulldogs mature slowly, they grow UP in
first two yrs then OUT. From 18-24 mo's, their heads drop & widens as does their
chests. Slow developing breeds should not be neutered/spayed early.
 

Reggies Parents

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Whether neutering will help really depends on the reason for the humping.
Reggie used to do it all the time, mostly due to his dominance issues. Since he was neutered he hardly ever humps. But they can hump when really excited too - and every now and again Reggie will get hyped up chasing the ball & will hump again, but its quickly over :D

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Cbrugs

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Jax, my Frenchie, was a big humper...always humping his toys and people. That stopped after he got neutered. He will hump Louie when they play but now over dominance. Louie had started marking everywhere including inside the house. He got neutered at just over 11 months and (knock on wood) hasn't marked inside since.
 
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Zue10

Zue10

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Mar 24, 2018
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Zeus
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Good for you to educate yourself and gather personal experience from others.

Excellent responses given to you for consideration of Zeus best health.

I left my males intact and if you do neuter try to wait until physical maturity.
This varies in different breeds, this way they get full health benefits of hormones
and full development of bone, etc. Bulldogs mature slowly, they grow UP in
first two yrs then OUT. From 18-24 mo's, their heads drop & widens as does their
chests. Slow developing breeds should not be neutered/spayed early.

Thank you so much for your advice! I think I will keep him intact for now, since he is not showing any signs of aggressive behavior and is not humping.
 

Reggies Parents

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Thank you so much for your advice! I think I will keep him intact for now, since he is not showing any signs of aggressive behavior and is not humping.
Sounds like you've made the best decision.
Our decision to go for neutering really was based on his awful, dominant behaviour but even then we knew it might not help. Luckily it did!!

Whether to do it in the future is another decision - and one that a lot of people seem to have strong opinions about, one way or the other.
I have heard from many sources that leaving them intact can lead to slightly shorter lives, and the obvious risk of testicular cancer is worth thinking about. But at least if his behaviour is good then you can leave that till he reaches a good age for it :)

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