Not new but returning

Jul 24, 2014
40
18
illinos
Bulldog(s) Names
sophia
Hi I’m Nancy mom to My 10 yr old bulldog Sophia.haven’t logged in in a while but since I’ve been having some new problems thought I’d come back and see what others are doing for them…namely acid reflux and tail pocket issues something most bulldog parents deal with sooner or later
 

rjisaterp

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Apr 18, 2014
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Somewhere in the Universe. Really Maryland.
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Hi I’m Nancy mom to My 10 yr old bulldog Sophia.haven’t logged in in a while but since I’ve been having some new problems thought I’d come back and see what others are doing for them…namely acid reflux and tail pocket issues something most bulldog parents deal with sooner or later
Hi Nancy, Welcome Back :welcome3:. There are a plethora threads regarding here on EBN about tail pockets.. In the top right-hand part of the EBN web page there is a "SEARCH" button. Click on that and then type in what you are searching for. In your case, it is "tail pockets." As you know, "it is a penny for your thoughts but, everyone wants to put in their two-cents worth." I hope this helps but other EBN members will chime in.

As you know, there are many articles related to bullies on the forum.

Welcome back again and your Sophia the bullshark is a real cutie.
 

rjisaterp

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Apr 18, 2014
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Somewhere in the Universe. Really Maryland.
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Cooper, Jewel (April 27, 2013-May 7, 2022-RIPDaddy's Girl) and (Bentley Oct 2013-Dec 2021)

SOURCE: https://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/digestive/c_multi_gastroesophageal_reflux

What Is Acid Reflux in Dogs?​


Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition where gastric or intestinal fluids reverse into the esophagus (the tube connecting the mouth to the stomach). This may be due to the muscular opening at the base of the esophagus (called the lower esophageal sphincter) relaxing. While this can occur during anesthesia, it also happens for unknown reasons, too.

Gastroesophageal reflux, also called “acid reflux,” is thought to be fairly common in dogs. It can happen to any dog (and it crops up in cats, too), although younger pups and brachycephalic (flat-faced) dogs are at greater risk.


The gastric acid, pepsin, bile salts, and other components of the gastrointestinal juices cause damage to the protective lining of the esophagus. This can result in inflammation of the esophagus (esophagitis).

Symptoms of Acid Reflux in Dogs​


Gastroesophageal reflux can cause esophagitis, but the condition’s tissue damage and pain levels vary. Mild esophagitis is limited to esophageal lining inflammation, while more severe ulcerative esophagitis causes damage to the deeper layers of the esophagus.

Symptoms of acid reflux in dogs include:
  • Regurgitating food
    • Evidence of pain (whining or pacing, for example)
    • Lack of appetite
    • Lip-licking
    • Coughing
    • Change in the sound of the bark
    • Weight loss

Young dogs may be at greater risk of developing GERD because their gastroesophageal sphincters are still developing. Long-term or chronic vomiting can also cause esophagitis.
  • Ingestion of a caustic agent
  • A foreign body in the dog’s throat
  • A tumor in the esophagus
  • A hernia next to the esophagus
  • Megaesophagus, a condition in dogs where the muscles of the esophagus do not function properly in pushing food into the stomach
  • Other diseases of the mouth, throat, or stomach

Treating Acid Reflux in Dogs​


Most treatment is done at home. Many dogs respond to eating a low-fat, prescription diet given in small, frequent meals. Dietary fat should be limited because fat stimulates gastric acid secretion.


Medications can also help. Drugs known as gastrointestinal pro-kinetic agents help stomach contents move through the organs and strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter. Veterinarians also often recommend medications to reduce stomach acid production and to protect the lining of the esophagus.

Managing Acid Reflux in Dogs​

After initial treatment, continue monitoring for gastroesophageal reflux in your dog, as it may flare up from time to time. Watch for signs of discomfort and the other symptoms of GERD.

A continued low-fat, low-protein diet will help prevent future incidences, and high-fat treats should be avoided, as they may worsen gastroesophageal reflux. Some dogs also require long-term treatment with medications.

If your dog doesn’t respond to initial medical treatments, follow-up diagnostic testing may be advised.

Preventing  Acid Reflux in Dogs​

High-fat foods can worsen acid reflux. The best way to prevent future flare-ups is a healthy diet that’s low in fat. Also, be sure to keep your dog on any maintenance medications that your veterinarian has recommended.


I hope this helps. RJ
 

benny

Well-known member
Jan 9, 2022
266
426
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united states
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Millie Vanilly
Tail pocket having issues:
- Chlorohexidine 2%, get very soft gauze or cloth and soak it with c-hex and soak and clean the area. Let it sit 5 minutes then gently dry with clean soft gauze or cloth
- Neo-predef - it requires a prescription from your vet, but it is what you want. Squirt the powder in and gently rub it everywhere, use a qtip if needed. It's expensive but a little goes a long ways.

Tail pocket not having issues:
- Clean with chlorhexidine as often as is needed. Keep dry
- Apply corn starch as if it was Neo-predef, but you can be more liberal

For others: be cautious using neo-predef on puppies
 

2BullyMama

I'm not OCD....now who moved my bulldog?
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Welcome back! the gang sure has you covered. Hope some of their information helps you and your girl
 

helsonwheels

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Jan 10, 2016
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Nyala, Jake (R.I.P. Duke)
Welcome back Nancy & Sophia.

Been 7 yrs I clean Nyala’s tail pocket. I use to clean every 3 days, for first couple yrs, then once a week now every 2 weeks. Fractionate Coconut Oil, lavender n tea tree. I modified it to:

4oz FCO
10 drops of Lavender
6 drops of Tea Tree
 

Cbrugs

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Dec 9, 2016
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Seattle, WA
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King Louie, Jax (French Bulldog), Ella Mae and Darla Rae
Tail pocket having issues:
- Chlorohexidine 2%, get very soft gauze or cloth and soak it with c-hex and soak and clean the area. Let it sit 5 minutes then gently dry with clean soft gauze or cloth
- Neo-predef - it requires a prescription from your vet, but it is what you want. Squirt the powder in and gently rub it everywhere, use a qtip if needed. It's expensive but a little goes a long ways.

Tail pocket not having issues:
- Clean with chlorhexidine as often as is needed. Keep dry
- Apply corn starch as if it was Neo-predef, but you can be more liberal

For others: be cautious using neo-predef on puppies
I love Neo-predef! Works great on drying up hotspots as well!
 

Bulldog2001

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May 5, 2022
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Welcome back!

For acid reflux, small more frequent meals and not too high fat diet(must be high quality NOT from the vet as it’s all fillers!)
What food are you currently feeding her?

Tail pocket:

I clean my dogs tail pocket daily and always make sure it’s dry after(the less moisture the better).
 
OP
Sophia the bullshark
Jul 24, 2014
40
18
illinos
Bulldog(s) Names
sophia
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #10
Welcome back!

For acid reflux, small more frequent meals and not too high fat diet(must be high quality NOT from the vet as it’s all fillers!)
What food are you currently feeding her?

Tail pocket:

I clean my dogs tail pocket daily and always make sure it’s dry after(the less moisture the better).
She is on a raw diet due to allergies I give her rabbit and beef with a daily whole sardine adding blackberries and riced broccoli and half teaspoon of spuillina powder for allergies. ( I feed her 4 X s a day)I was giving her pork but noticed that really irritated her reflux. Same with 70/30 ground beef. I use 90/10 with better outcome. So for her it is definitely fat content.I give her pepcid morning and night. Just recently starting the night because she’s been waking up with acid reflux.

for tail pockets I’ve been trying different things. curasb sppray with chlorhexidine and ketoconazole But seem to have some luck with squirting blue powder ear treatment in there with a suction bulb , cleaning out with a Q tip , dry real good then applying A and D diaper rash cream daily. I noticed some here are recommending goldbond powder but I don’t know how they are getting the powder in there I could sprinkle it on a q tip but how could that possibly be enough to help. Her tail pocket is deep and tight.
thank you for any ide
 
Last edited:

helsonwheels

Well-known member
Jan 10, 2016
12,617
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Alberta
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Bulldog(s) Names
Nyala, Jake (R.I.P. Duke)
@Sophia the bullshark you’re feeding her well. Just like in humans, OTC tablets like pepcid, tums etc can often be the culprit. Try digestive enzymes instead. Add fermented food to the meals to get the gut going. Zinc is also good. And any veggies that’s high in acidity won’t help. Look them up.

Tail pocket, again try my recipe above. Works 👍
 
OP
Sophia the bullshark
Jul 24, 2014
40
18
illinos
Bulldog(s) Names
sophia
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #12
@Sophia the bullshark you’re feeding her well. Just like in humans, OTC tablets like pepcid, tums etc can often be the culprit. Try digestive enzymes instead. Add fermented food to the meals to get the gut going. Zinc is also good. And any veggies that’s high in acidity won’t help. Look them up.

Tail pocket, again try my recipe above. Works 👍
Thanks I’m gonna look into that and give digestive enzymes a try. fermented foods too. Thanks very much
 

Bulldog2001

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May 5, 2022
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Your definitely feeding her good food!

Agree- Digestive enzymes would be a good thing to try and maybe he won’t need the pepsid. The Four Leaf Rover brand makes really good products(I have heave my dog the Digest for digestive enzymes before and it definitely works).
 

oscarmayer

Have Bulldog Will Travel
Staff member
Jan 20, 2016
4,233
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VA
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Lala, Dozer, Chesty, Winky & Waggles
Agree with the aforementioned & especially like the idea of smaller more frequent meals...basically giving that steady stream of stomach acid something to do. Please report back how things go.
 

benny

Well-known member
Jan 9, 2022
266
426
Country
united states
Bulldog(s) Names
Millie Vanilly
I noticed some here are recommending goldbond powder but I don’t know how they are getting the powder in there I could sprinkle it on a q tip but how could that possibly be enough to help. Her tail pocket is deep and tight.
It is similar to Neo-Predef and Cornstarch so I’ll tell you what I do with them:

For the neopredef I shake it into an opening I make with my other hand. Make a pile on the side and then with a qtip I work it into the pocket.

For cornstarch and I am assuming this will be what you do with gold bond: transfer into a small Tupperware. Use a qtip to sort of scoop the powder, get a little mound. Using your other hand open up a spot on the side that you can bring the qtip to. When next to it, turn the qtip dumping the powder into the opening then use the qtip to work it into the tail. Then grab a clean qtip and repeat. It will take a little practice.
 

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