Excessive Drooling- Help!

Bulldog2001

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My French Bulldog is 4 years old.

He started drooling Puddles of water from his mouth! The one side of his mouth where the drooling is coming from, that side of his face below the mouth is SO wet from the puddles of watery drool.

I have no idea why he is doing this, he has done this once before but drooling was minimal. This is literally puddles non stop of drool!

I have looked in his mouth a few times now and I don’t see anything that would cause this.


Anyone with experience with this excessive drooling puddles?

Why would he be drooling this much???
 
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jsygrls

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I have no idea why he is doing this, he has done this once before but drooling was minimal. This is literally puddles non stop of drool!
Is there any food or fruit involved when you notice this drool (i.e. prep for for lunch/ breakfast, etc.)?

My guy has the same issue when he sees or hears a banana being pealed or apples cut up.
 
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Bulldog2001

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Is there any food or fruit involved when you notice this drool (i.e. prep for for lunch/ breakfast, etc.)?

My guy has the same issue when he sees or hears a banana being pealed or apples cut up.

No, it was random and no food around him.

He drooling puddles from yesterday around 5pm and still continues to, his blanket in his bed was SO wet, about 1/3-1/2 his blanket was so wet this morning. Very lethargic and seems very sore and tired.

Vet appointment is in a few hours, hopefully nothing serious!
 

rjisaterp

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From PetMD: https://www.petmd.com/dog/symptoms/why-your-dog-excessively-drooling

Drooling is normal for many dogs. But if your dog starts drooling a lot more than usual, or if your dog never drools but suddenly starts, it’s cause for concern.
Excessive drooling in dogs can have a lot of different causes. Here’s some insight on what to check for, what might be causing it, and when to seek veterinary help.

Why Do Dogs Drool?​


When a dog eats, the salivary glands in their neck and jaw area produce saliva to help with digestion. Drooling occurs when saliva escapes the mouth. It may happen if your dog sees a treat or when you’re opening a can of dog food.
Drooling is not an issue in most dog breeds. Breeds with large upper lips, such as the Mastiff and St. Bernard, will usually drool more than others.

Why Is My Dog Drooling a Lot?

Excessive drooling in dogs (also known as hypersalivation) can indicate a serious or even life-threatening situation, especially if your dog has other symptoms.


What is considered to be excessive drooling? It depends on how much your dog normally drools. Some breeds drool more than others, so you should compare your dog’s drooling with the amount that’s normal for your dog.


Many conditions can cause dogs to suddenly drool excessively. Here are some common reasons:


Gastrointestinal disorders: Conditions involving the gastrointestinal tract, such as esophagitis, gastritis, enteritis, pancreatitis, foreign body obstruction, gastric ulceration, inflammatory bowel disease, and gastrointestinal cancers can cause drooling in dogs. Usually this is secondary to nausea induced by these medical conditions.


Gum (periodontal) disease or other oral issue: Drooling can be caused by periodontal disease such as gingivitis or stomatitis, or other oral problems such as a sialocele, tumor, or infection. Look for other signs such as a mass, blood, pus, or bad breath.


Mouth injury: Blunt force trauma, chewing on a sharp object, or foreign material that’s lodged in the mouth (splinter or piece of bone) may all be to blame.


Chemical or electrical burn: Many caustic chemicals, such as battery acid, and any electrical burn (for example, from chewing an electrical cord) can cause bleeding and sometimes drooling. Chemical burns are often accompanied by pain and lesions, and your pet may paw at their mouth. Call your vet right away if you suspect these types of injury.


Toxins and Venoms: Consuming a poisonous plant, food, or drug can cause anything from drooling and pawing at the mouth to life-threatening side effects. Animal venom or secretions, such as a bite from a black widow spider or licking a toad, can also cause your dog to drool. Many plants are irritating or poisonous to dogs when chewed on or eaten. Some common plants that are dangerous for pets are peace lilies and mother-in-law’s tongue. If a plant is toxic enough to cause excessive salivation, it could have other serious effects, so always contact your vet in this case.


Anxiety: You might notice excessive salivation as the result of anxiety caused by going to the vet, moving to a new home, or even riding in a car. Your dog may also be restless, pant, or have diarrhea along with the drooling.


Pain in the abdomen: Abdominal pain often appears together with other signs, such as restlessness, diarrhea, loss of appetite, or even abdominal distention. Some dogs will guard their abdomen to avoid being touched where it hurts.


Neurological conditions: Dog drooling could indicate damage to the nerve that connects to the salivary gland, damage to the salivary gland, or damage to the brain. You may also see uneven pupils, lethargy, and weakness. Some neurological conditions can also make it hard for your dog to swallow their saliva. If your dog has difficulty swallowing, call your vet right away.


Viral or bacterial infection: Rabies and tetanus can both cause drooling in dogs.


Congenital defects: These are conditions that dogs are born with. A few examples include a hiatal hernia (when the upper section of the abdomen pushes into the chest) or portosystemic shunt, a circulatory abnormality.

When to See a Vet if Your Dog Is Drooling Excessively​


Seek immediate veterinary help if your dog shows other signs and symptoms, such as:
  • Vomiting or regurgitation
  • Diarrhea
  • Bleeding
  • Lethargy or weakness
  • Loss of appetite or other changes in eating behavior
  • Changes in behavior, such as aggressiveness or whining, which can indicate pain
  • Dizziness, head-tilting, or trouble with balance
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Uneven pupils
  • Restlessness or panting
  • Abdominal distention
  • Pawing at the mouth

How Vets Find the Cause of Excessive Drooling in Dogs​


First, your vet will do a physical exam and will check your dog’s mouth and neck. They will take a full medical history if it’s not on file, including vaccinations, medications, exposure to potential poisons, and foreign objects that your dog could have eaten.


Your vet may recommend certain diagnostic tests, depending on the most likely suspected cause. They may include:


  • X-rays, CT scan, MRI, or ultrasound to examine internal organs or possible tumors
  • Tissue biopsy to check for immune issues or tumors
Treatment of Excessive Drooling in Dogs

You can’t treat your dog’s excessive drooling at home. First, see your vet to determine the underlying cause. The vet can recommend the proper treatment, which could include:
  • Dental treatment if the cause is due to periodontal disease (this may require removing teeth)
  • Medication such as antibiotics if the cause is bacterial
  • Surgical intervention in some cases of trauma and congenital defects
  • Surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy may be suggested to treat tumors
  • Pain medication and anti-inflammatory medications
  • Medicated mouthwash (with diluted chlorhexidine or benzoyl peroxide)

Excessive Drooling in Dogs FAQs​

Do Dogs Drool When They’re Nervous?
Yes. Panting, pacing, and drooling excessively can be signs of anxiety and stress in dogs.
Why Does My Dog Drool in the Car?
Dogs will often drool in the car because of motion sickness. Riding in the car can cause vertigo-like feelings for your pet, which causes nausea and drooling. Also, some dogs get stressed on car rides, and if dogs get nervous, they are more prone to drool.
 
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Bulldog2001

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How did the visit go with the Vet? Puppy OK?

Thanks for the info above. Rusty never drools, not even for food, like never drools, so the fact that he was drooling Puddles was very concerning from 5 pm to 10;00 am the next morning didn’t stop until 30 minutes before the vet visit. He was crying and pacing and uncomfortable before we took him to the vet, he was in pain.

Tuesday and Wednesday he played hard with my neighbours dog and then played a ton with my other dogs, but since he is a Frenchie he is much smaller than the retrievers. He jumped and fell on his side Twice while playing with them which I forgot about.

He was Licking his chops for the past 3 days.

The vet said his teeth and gums look great, she thought at first it was his back, but she said he doesn’t seem like his back is sore, so it’s not that.

She thinks it’s Acid Reflux, which he hasn’t had before. He already gets small frequent meals.
They did bloodwork and checking his pancreas too, should get the results today. I hope it all comes back normal and nothing serious is wrong with him, he is only 4. They will call with The results today hopefully.

But after the vet visit yesterday, he seems like his joints are very sore, and seems like his whole body is sore.
We are hoping he just over played and when he fell on his side a few time he is sore from that, we are hoping his back is OK as that’s always been my Huge concern/worry. They are very good at hiding the pain, it’s so hard to know what’s wrong.

He has never cried from being sore or acted like this from being unwell, so not himself, not even drooling before or pacing and uncomfortable , all this is VERY concerning.

He seems a little perked up last night, not drooling much right now. Still licking his chops. Still seems very sore, I really hope it’s NOT his back cause he does have IVDD.
I’m giving him more joint supplements and omega 3 more to help with the inflammation and joints pain.
 

2BullyMama

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It's a frenchie thing.... Cheli has done it all his life and I've taken him to the vet the first few times.... no reason found as to why it happens. It is like a water fountain is turned on and there is never an issue or reason why it happens.

When it happens, I check his gums, teeth and all look great so I just wipe and move along.
 
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Bulldog2001

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It's a frenchie thing.... Cheli has done it all his life and I've taken him to the vet the first few times.... no reason found as to why it happens. It is like a water fountain is turned on and there is never an issue or reason why it happens.

When it happens, I check his gums, teeth and all look great so I just wipe and move along.

Buckets of water for more than 12-14 hrs without it stopping is normal for Frenchies????

That’s a scary amount of drool and Rusty was in pain and crying in the morning, which is why I took him to vet, I wiped his face where it was wet but it was continuously drool without stopping and crying in pain. Teeth and gums were good. 5pm to 10:00 am of non stop drool and crying in pain. He vomited 1 time(yellow foam) before drool started as well.

They did bloodwork and I’m waiting to hear the results.

She thinks possibly acid reflux, but his joints are sore/stiff and painful as well. So 2 problems Caused this crazy amount of drool.

Again, Rusty never drools, not one bit even for food. He looked SO unwell and sick and painful to move around from his joints from overplaying with my other dogs(he did fall on his side a few times from jumping at my other dogs to play), which I think was him sore from the day before.

Drool happened the next 2 days and crying as well and when moving his joints pain as well. So acid reflux and joints are sore from overplay vet thinks.

Interesting they can do it for no reason though. At least we hopefully found the problem for Rusty’s pain.
 

2BullyMama

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Buckets of water for more than 12-14 hrs without it stopping is normal for Frenchies????

That’s a scary amount of drool and Rusty was in pain and crying in the morning, which is why I took him to vet, I wiped his face where it was wet but it was continuously drool without stopping and crying in pain. Teeth and gums were good. 5pm to 10:00 am of non stop drool and crying in pain. He vomited 1 time(yellow foam) before drool started as well.

They did bloodwork and I’m waiting to hear the results.

She thinks possibly acid reflux, but his joints are sore/stiff and painful as well. So 2 problems Caused this crazy amount of drool.

Again, Rusty never drools, not one bit even for food. He looked SO unwell and sick and painful to move around from his joints from overplaying with my other dogs(he did fall on his side a few times from jumping at my other dogs to play), which I think was him sore from the day before.

Drool happened the next 2 days and crying as well and when moving his joints pain as well. So acid reflux and joints are sore from overplay vet thinks.

Interesting they can do it for no reason though. At least we hopefully found the problem for Rusty’s pain.
I did NOT say it was normal... I said it is a "thing" big difference... meaning it can happen at times.. The only diagnosis I sort of was given is an occasional overactive saliva gland. yes, 12-24 hours soaking the towels, blanket, sheet and pillow he was on. he is now 12 years old and doing fantastic even with this happening at times
 
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Bulldog2001

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I did NOT say it was normal... I said it is a "thing" big difference... meaning it can happen at times.. The only diagnosis I sort of was given is an occasional overactive saliva gland. yes, 12-24 hours soaking the towels, blanket, sheet and pillow he was on. he is now 12 years old and doing fantastic even with this happening at times

I wasn’t meaning it like that. I never meant it like that. I was confirming if that much drool for that long of time without stopping is common in Frenchies?

That’s great Cheli is 12 years and doing well.

My vet also said sometimes it happens for no reason.

Good to know it can happen for no reason in frenchies.

Thank you for your response, I just wanted to make sure I didn’t leave out any details when I responded back to you with Rusty’s symptoms and scary signs.

Again sorry if it came across like that.
 

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