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Thread: Stomach Twisting?

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    Dog Park Attendant hnhammond's Avatar
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    Unhappy Stomach Twisting?

    How likely are bulldogs to fall victim to stomach twisting? I know it's more common in large breeds. I have a friend whose great dane died from it.

    For those who don't know, dogs can actually have their stomachs twist if they are too active right after eating. And it can be fatal.

    I am super paranoid about it, and always try to get Matilda to be calm after eating, for about an hour. But sometimes she's just too hyper and runs around anyway. How big of a risk is this to bullies? Do you worry about it? And how do you prevent it?

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    Default Re: Stomach Twisting?

    i do not know the percentage or how likely, but i do know it can happen to any dog at anytime... it is just more prone to larger breeds. A few years back, we did have a members Bulldog pass from bloat (stomach twist)
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    Default Re: Stomach Twisting?

    It can happen to any dog in theory, but it's definitely more common in large deep chested dogs. Try to keep your dog from eating too quickly and obviously lots of exercise right after a meal is a bad idea. I wouldn't worry too much about it though. Just know the symptoms and do what you can to prevent it
    "The better I get to know men, the more I find myself loving dogs.
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    Default Re: Stomach Twisting?

    Larger breeds and breeds with broad chests are the most susceptible but it can happen to any breed. I lost a Ridgeback many years ago to this.
    Bulldogs are like potato chips. You just can't stop with one.

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    Default Re: Stomach Twisting?

    What Is Bloat?


    When bloat occurs, the dog’s stomach fills with air, fluid and/or food. The enlarged stomach puts pressure on other organs, can cause difficulty breathing, and eventually may decrease blood supply to a dog’s vital organs.


    People often use the word "bloat" to refer to a life-threatening condition that requires immediate veterinary care known as gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV), gastric torsion and twisted stomach. This condition can cause rapid clinical signs and death in several hours. Even with immediate treatment, approximately 25% to 40% of dogs die from this medical emergency.


    What Are the General Symptoms of Bloat/GDV in Dogs?


    Distended abdomen
    Unsuccessful attempts to belch or vomit
    Retching without producing anything
    Weakness
    Excessive salivation
    Shortness of breath
    Cold body temperature
    Pale gums
    Rapid heartbeat
    Collapse
    What Causes Bloat in Dogs?


    The exact cause is currently unknown. Certain risk factors include: rapid eating, eating one large meal daily, dry food-only diet, overeating, overdrinking, heavy exercise after eating, fearful temperament, stress, trauma and abnormal gastric motility or hormone secretion.


    What Causes GDV in Dogs?


    The exact cause is currently unknown.


    What Should I Do If I Think My Dog Has Bloat?


    Bring your dog to a veterinarian immediately. Timeliness of treatment is paramount, since a dog exhibiting signs of bloat may actually have GDV, which is fatal if not promptly treated.


    How Is Bloat Treated?


    Depending on your dog’s condition, a veterinarian may take an X-ray of the abdomen to assess the stomach’s position. The vet may try to decompress the stomach and relieve gas and fluid pressure by inserting a tube down the esophagus.


    How Is GDV Treated?


    If the stomach has rotated, emergency surgery is necessary to correct torsion. There are many complications that can occur both during and after surgery, including heart damage, infection and shock; intensive post-operative monitoring for several days is routine. Most vets will recommend that during this surgery, the dog's stomach be permanently attached to the side of the abdominal cavity in order to prevent future episodes.


    Are Certain Breeds Prone to Bloat/GDV?


    Most dogs love to overeat if given the opportunity, so any dog, from a Greyhound to a Chihuahua, can get bloat.


    However, it is very rare for dogs that are not large, deep-chested breeds to be struck with GDV. This condition most often afflicts those dogs whose chests present a higher depth-to-width ratio. In other words, their chests are long (from backbone to sternum) rather than wide. Such breeds include Saint Bernards, Akitas, Irish Setters, Boxers, Basset Hounds, Great Danes, Weimaraners and German Shepherds.


    How Can I Prevent Bloat/GDV?


    Feed your dog several small meals, rather than one or two larger ones, throughout the day to avoid eating too much or too fast.
    If appropriate (check with your vet), include canned food in your dog’s diet.
    Maintain your dog’s appropriate weight.
    Avoid feeding your dog from a raised bowl unless advised to do so by your vet.
    Encourage normal water consumption.
    Limit rigorous exercise before and after meals.
    Consider a prophylactic gastropexy surgery (which fixes the stomach in place, as described above) if you have a high-risk breed.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Stomach Twisting?

    Happened to my 2 year old male bully in November, we minutes away from loosing him, we almost did on the way to the vets.

    Had surgery to correct the twisted stomach and fortunately no damage to his stomach wall or organs. He also had a pexy where they stitch the wall of his tummy to the rib cage.

    It's more common than to Bulldogs than you think. Fortunately I was home when it happened at googled the symptoms.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Bulldog Vet in Training Christie H's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stomach Twisting?

    Oh my..I had a lab pass from this exact thing.He had surgery but a blood clot went to his heart after they untwisted it.So I'm extra afraid of this.

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