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Thread: Bad Breath. How do you handle this with Bullies ?

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    Dog Park Attendant Become a 4 Paw Member Maximus's Avatar
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    Default Bad Breath. How do you handle this with Bullies ?

    Maximus has bad breath. Does anyone know how to handle this? Are there any products (eatable bones for bad breath, or sprays) that will help with bad breath.
    Brushing teeth doesn't seem to be enough for Maximus. Thanks.

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    Default Re: Bad Breath. How do you handle this with Bullies ?

    Have you taken a look at his teeth? The only time my dogs have had bad breath is when their teeth needed cleaning/tarter.Or could be food caught between gums and teeth? There are products, such as Greenies, and other products that are supposed to help-also there are sprays. Do you give him plain yogurt? That could possibly help, as it would help with his digestion-if he is not allergic to milk products. My dogs chew nylabone/durabones, and their teeth stay clean, and so far they haven't had bad breath. I would guess that certain foods could cause bad breath also. Someone else will be by to add their thoughts,too. ( By the way-I used to live in Toms River!)
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    Default Re: Bad Breath. How do you handle this with Bullies ?

    I was going to suggest the same thing -- make sure he does not have a bad or broken tooth
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    Default Re: Bad Breath. How do you handle this with Bullies ?

    Here's the weird thing ---- Maximus has been to the Vet countless times, and was there just this past Saturday. The Vet examined him all over EXCEPT for his mouth and teeth. And this is not the first time this has happened. What is it with Vets ??? !!! They never check their mouth, gums or teeth, and I don't know why. I think I'm going to have to say something the next time Maximus goes to see
    the Vet, but not-for-nothing, I really don't understand WHY Vets do not open the dogs mouth to check his teeth, gums and overall dental health.

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    Default Re: Bad Breath. How do you handle this with Bullies ?

    Bad Breath in Dogs
    In this article


    What Is Bad Breath Caused By?


    How Can I Determine the Cause of My Dog’s Bad Breath?



    We all know bad breath -- also known as halitosis -- when we smell it. Bad breath is the result of a build-up of odor-producing bacteria in your dog’s mouth, lungs, or gut. Persistent bad breath can indicate that your dog needs better dental care or that something is wrong in his gastrointestinal tract, liver, or kidneys. In all cases, halitosis is a red flag that should be investigated.


    What Is Bad Breath Caused By?




    Most often, canine bad breath is caused by dental or gum disease, and certain dogs -- particularly small ones -- are especially prone to plaque and tartar. However, persistent bad breath can also indicate larger medical problems in the mouth, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, or internal organs.


    How Can I Determine the Cause of My Dog’s Bad Breath?


    Your veterinarian is the best person to pinpoint the cause. A physical examination and laboratory work may be performed. Be ready to answer questions about your dog’s diet, oral hygiene, exercise habits, and general behavior.




    When Is It Time To See the Vet?


    If your dog’s breath suddenly has an unusual smell, please consult your veterinarian. The following cases can signal medical problems that need immediate treatment.


    Unusually sweet or fruity breath could indicate diabetes, particularly if your dog has been drinking and urinating more frequently than usual.
    Breath that smells like urine can be a sign of kidney disease.
    An unusually foul odor accompanied by vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas or gums could signal a liver problem.



    How Is Bad Breath Treated?


    Treatment depends on your vet’s diagnosis. If plaque is the culprit, your dog might require a professional cleaning. If it’s an issue of diet, you might have to change your dog’s regular food. If the cause is gastrointestinal or an abnormality in your dog’s liver, kidneys, or lungs, please consult your vet about steps you should take.


    How Can I Prevent My Dog From Having Bad Breath?


    Many people assume that bad breath in dogs, especially at a certain age, is a “given.” But that’s not the case. In fact, being proactive about your pup’s oral health will not only make your life together more pleasant, it’s smart preventive medicine.


    Bring your dog in for regular checkups to make sure he has no underlying medical issues that may cause halitosis.
    Make sure your vet monitors and tracks the state of your dog’s teeth and breath.
    Feed your dog a high-quality, easy-to-digest food.
    Brush your dog’s teeth frequently -- every day is ideal. (Please be sure to use toothpaste formulated for dogs as human toothpaste can upset a canine’s stomach.)
    Provide hard, safe chew toys that allow your dog’s teeth to be cleaned by the natural process of chewing.
    Give your dog well-researched treats formulated to improve breath odor.
    Discuss home-use oral health products with your veterinarian to see if there’s a type he or she recommends.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Healthy dogs shouldn’t have bad breath


    September 17, 2014 posted by Editor
    By Karen A. Soukiasian


    A healthy dog should not have bad breath.


    The reality is, approximately 80 percent of dogs do suffer from gingivitis or a periodontal disease by the time they are 5 years old.




    Desensitize your dog to having their mouths examined and teeth brushed by starting when they are young.


    Now and then a simple dental procedure such as a professional cleaning or perhaps a bad tooth extracted can save your pet from a lot of suffering. It should be noted, the older a dog gets, the more likely their breath will reflect their general health.


    The most common causes of bad breath in dogs are countless. Let’s start with what they eat. Some canned dog foods, dry food high in fish oils, food too hard to digest, raw food diets, sneaking a snack or two from the cat’s food bowl, not to mention the litter box, can have a serious effect on your dog’s breath.


    In some cases, it may not necessarily be their breath. Bearded dogs, and dogs that lick their butts or anal glands, often smell rather ripe. Keep a washcloth handy.


    Other causes may be food or hair stuck between their teeth.


    It could be something stuck in their nose. Veterinarians have pulled interesting objects out. They range from plants/weeds such as foxtails, to string, dry food, even toys, out of the noses of smelly dogs. In defense of the dog, on occasion they have found a young human co-conspirator assisted in the venture.


    On a slightly more severe level, your dog could be suffering from a broken tooth, tooth decay, gum disease, a sinus infection, a respiratory infection or possibly an abscess in their mouth or throat.


    The most critical source of bad breath in dogs can be caused by kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, lung disease, and oral or throat tumors.


    The best thing to do is to desensitize your dog, while they are still a puppy, to having their mouth examined and their teeth brushed. Do not use human toothpaste. There are toothpastes made specifically for dogs. You can use a regular toothbrush, washcloth or a finger brush made for brushing your dog’s teeth.


    Check with your veterinarian about having your dog’s mouth examined and their teeth professionally cleaned at least once a year.


    Here are few home remedies dogs owners claim help to keep their dog’s breath tolerable in between vet visits. They include adding parsley to their diet, hard biscuits, dry food, a tablespoon of plain yogurt (no flavors or sugar/sugar substitutes) added to their food, baby carrots or carrots cut up into bite size pieces, raw bones, Nylabones and charcoal biscuits or tablets.


    Bottom line: Don’t wait too long. If the bad breath problem persists, have your dog examined by your veterinarian.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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