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Thread: Big Chicken

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    Pet Sitter Corlando465's Avatar
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    Default Big Chicken

    Hello all you Bulldog lovers. I'm looking for some advice regarding my sweet pal. He is 3 years old and has been with us since he was 8 weeks. I I know this breed is typically a little edgy, especially around new things or unfamiliar surroundings, but lately my boy has been a real scaredy cat! If I didn't know better I'd swear he'd been mistreated but that has most definitely not happened. We moved about a year ago - normal transition and only 3 miles away so no boarding or transport. It's just so strange for that it's getting worse with age and he does seem a bit more withdrawn lately. His jumpiness is so bad at times, that he gets all choked up, that I'm fearful he will aspirate. I thought about crating him again, so he could have a safe zone, but he hasn't been crated since he was 10 months old and didn't like the separation, so I think that would be worse.... Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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    cali baker's Avatar
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    Default Re: Big Chicken

    Where and when does he get "jumpy" and nervous? is it when he's out for a walk or meets other dogs or people? Finn is a bit skittish and i've noticed when we go out for a walk at night, he is more apprhensive. I attribute this to the car lights that seem to be coming right at him. Has Tank been checked out by the vet lately? you may want to do that since you mentioned him being a little more withdrawn recently. If everything's okay w/him physically, i don't know if crating him would be the best thing since you don't want to encourage him to be more withdrawn or isolated. Of course, the crate can always be there for him to retreat into but not so much as a substitute for socializing.




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    EBN's SWEETHEART aka our little GOOB Become a 4 Paw Member
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    ddnene's Avatar
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    Default Re: Big Chicken

    I agree w/Henny above @cali baker
    I will tell you this as to my experience w/bullies… we had a female Bella that seemed to go OCD out of control the older that she got. I never quite figured out what the problem was, but she became more on edge.

    "What we once enjoyed and deeply loved, we can never lose, for all that we love deeply becomes a part of us." Helen Keller
    RIP Wellie, Bella, Winston & Roxie

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    Newbie BuckeyeBullyMama's Avatar
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    Default Re: Big Chicken

    What your describing sounds a bit like how our Cooper was. We lost Coop to uncontrollable seizures at a very young age. He was our first bulldog and in retrospect, some things we attributed to behavior was actually seizure activity. We dismissed the symptoms as behavior and his problems progressed rapidly and suddenly. What you are describing sounds possibly like it could be the postictal phase of a seizure, especially your worry about aspiration-we thought Cooper was "puppy crying" like when a toddler can't catch their breath. I'd suggest watching your pal closely and keep notes as to how often and the circumstances it happens under. If it's becoming more & more frequent maybe consider an observation with the vet. Keep us posted!

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    I'm not OCD....now who moved my bulldog? I am an EBN Reporter
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    2BullyMama's Avatar
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    Default Re: Big Chicken

    some do get more OCD with age, but have you had your vet to a check for any health issues? since you been in the home over a year I would think it would not be that, could be but, I would have you vet check him from head to toe and as another posted stated take notes of when it happens and see if there is a trend developing
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
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    Default Re: Big Chicken

    Hi you have received great advice above. I also have a male bully named Bulldozer, he has been skittish since we got him at 10 weeks old. He is well socialized and loves people and children and other dogs, but he has never liked to walk, he mostly just goes out to potty and then back in the house, although when we go to the park he will run around and play with his sister. He doesn't like traffic, he is terrified when cars whoosh by us and he tries to run from it. He's afraid of blowing leaves, he hates loud noises, like dishes going on the dishwasher or being out away, he hates the sound of pits and pans, he won't go neat the garbage can, and he runs and cowers from the vacuum. I have to crate him when I vacuum. He shakes when he hears thunder or fire crackers. I have heard that giving your dog Melatonin can help them be more calm and overcome anxiety. I haven't tried it, but have thought about it. There is also a product you can buy at the pet store called the Thunder Shirt, it's a t-shirt that hugs their body when they wear it, and it's supposed to reduce anxiety.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    What is Melatonin? What is it used for in the dog? This article will cover dose rates for Melatonin, give you some basic information about Melatonin and also list some it's potential side effects.




    1. Melatonin is a class of drug called a neuro-hormone, it has a number of potential veterinary uses such as sedative properties, may act as an anti-convulsant, and it can help regulate your dog's body rhythms and reproductive cycles. But it also appears to have uses as an antioxidant which will combat free radicals which may be important in some disease conditions. This drug is available over the counter in a number of countries in the world but is not specifically licensed for animal use, that said many vets have found it to be of use in the following specific situations.


    A. Melatonin has been used in the treatment of separation anxiety in dogs.


    B. It is also used to treat other stressful conditions, such as noise anxieties related to fireworks etc.


    C. Melatonin has been used to help sleep patterns in pets that are very active at night and not sleeping at the right time. This can sometimes occur in older dogs ( sundowner syndrome ) Basically it helps re-sets the animal's biological clock.


    D. It has been used to treat various other behavioral problems in dogs and it has sedative properties.


    2. Dose rates for Melatonin in the dog : While this is an over the counter drug it is used in some complex situations, you would therefor be wise to get your vet involved rather than self treat on your own. That said for small dogs, Melatonin is given at up to 1 mg per dog three times a day orally. For medium sized dogs a dose of up to 3 mg per dog three times a day has been used orally. And in larger dogs consider a dose rate of up to 9 mg dog orally again given three times a day. The duration of the course would depend on the response to treatment and any side effects which may occur. This drug has often been safely used in dogs when given for long periods of time.


    3. Side effects : This drug is generally considered to be safe and few side effects have been noted, but like any drug hypersensitivity reactions are possible in a very small number of individuals. Other side effects have been related to drug interaction with medications which the dog is already taking such as sedatives, steroids and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. With some individuals you may see excessive lethargy or paradoxically nervous behaviour. Lastly it can interfere with your female dog's reproductive cycle.


    4. Melatonin is being recommended by more and more vets for the treatment of Canine Cushings disease. Click this link to get melatonin for dogs.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Melatonin is a drug commonly used to treat alopecia (hair loss) in dogs, of which the condition “cyclic follicular dysplasia” is most common. Aside from the treatment of alopecia, melatonin has several other uses such as the treatment of anxiety and insomnia. Anybody who has dealt with insomnia at some point knows what a nightmare the condition can be, and it’s every bit as disruptive when it affects our pets. Insomnia prevents our body from getting the rest that it needs for recovery and growth, and can severely limit our abilities in day-to-day life. So how do you treat a dog with insomnia? It’s not a simple case of walking into the nearest pharmacy and picking up the first sleep aid you see, because many medicines which are used to treat humans contain ingredients which are highly toxic to dogs. This means that a great deal of care must be taken, as well as research, to ensure that what you’re giving to your dog is helpful rather than harmful.


    Melatonin dosage for dogs



    Unlike most other substances, the dosage of melatonin isn’t notated in an X mg per lb format, but splits into three distinct dosages. These dosages are as follows:


    0-30 lb dog – 1.5 mg
    31-99 lb dog – 3 mg
    100+ lbs – 6 mg
    To be administered up to three times a day at 8 hour intervals. Do not exceed these amounts. Consult with a vet before giving melatonin to your dog so that he or she can recommend to you the correct dosage for your pet depending on their circumstances/medical history, and advise whether or not this substance is the best solution for your dog.


    Is melatonin safe for dogs?



    Yes, melatonin is a safe drug for use in dogs, it is often thought of by experts as being as safe for use in dogs as it is for use in humans. However, like with most drugs, if it is the first time you have ever administered melatonin to your dog, you should be extra vigilant in case of any (extremely rare) unanticipated side effects. Before using this substance, consider whether your dog’s problems are caused by physical or emotional distress, as in cases of emotional problems the use of substances may be entirely avoided in favor of helping your dog to work through whatever it is that’s bothering him. In older pets afflicted with insomnia you can also try providing a light snack before bed, using a night light, putting the radio on (low volume) and ensuring a warm, comfortable bed for him/her. If the problem persists then using substances such as melatonin may be your best option.


    Safety precautions



    Before giving melatonin to your dog, make sure you understand the following safety precautions:


    Do not give to pregnant dogs
    Be careful not to overdose your pet
    Consult with a vet before using the drug to discuss the correct dosage for your dog
    In cases of hair loss, get your dog checked for thyroid disease, parasitic or bacterial infections and Cushing’s disease
    Typically melatonin is a very safe drug for use in dogs, however an overdose may lead to problems, which is why it is important to be careful with the dosage you administer and also the frequency of administration. Remember that human medication is often supplied in dosages much higher than the safe amount for dogs. Signs of an overdose include diarrhea, vomiting, loss of coordination and in bad cases, seizures. However you should be aware that gastric upset may also be present in cases of safe usage. If serious side effects present themselves you should always seek professional veterinary attention right away though it is unlikely you will encounter issues.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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