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Thread: Gagging and white foam

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    Default Gagging and white foam

    My 9 years bullie has been gagging shortly after eating his nutripro and puking up white foam. Also seems to be drinking a lot of water then that comes up too.
    Interesting note that this doesn't happen with chicken or rice. Is this a food allergy, or related to kennel cough or what? Not sure if he even has kennel cough but the vet has had him on Cephalexin for over a week. She did and X-ray and didn't see anything but she wasn't looking for kennel cough, she was looking at his throat and heart I think.

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    Default Re: Gagging and white foam

    White foam is usually a sign of too much phelm in the throat, you can squirt a little lemon juice to see if it helps... how is his breathing? did the vet check his soft palate?
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    Default Re: Gagging and white foam

    His breathing seems to be short quick breaths. How does the vet check his palate? Does she have to scope him for that or
    is it done with an ultrasound? She's only done X-rays.

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    Default Re: Gagging and white foam

    Quote Originally Posted by Dolly View Post
    His breathing seems to be short quick breaths. How does the vet check his palate? Does she have to scope him for that or
    is it done with an ultrasound? She's only done X-rays.
    No, they just have to look down the throat... short quick breathing can be a sign of pain. I would have him in for an exam
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    Default Re: Gagging and white foam

    Hi Dolly, coughing and Phlegm in a dog can be caused by many reasons, allergies, respiratory infections, infections or viruses. It's best to have the vet check him out to determine the cause, so it can be treated properly.

    When Your Dog Can’t Stop Coughing


    It's normal for your dog to cough every now and then. It's part of everyday life for an animal that can sniff 4 to 6 times per second. But if your dog does it a lot or can’t seem to stop, you may have a sick pup, and he may need treatment.


    What’s Behind the Cough?


    Like us, dogs cough to get rid of dust, germs, and other stuff they breathe in.


    Also like us, they sometimes get infections or viruses.


    Dogs are social creatures that naturally sniff and slurp. This is why bacteria and viruses – including a canine form of the flu -- quickly spread from dog to dog. Germs also can land on floors, furniture, food bowls, toys, and other surfaces where the next dog to come along picks them up.




    Kennel cough is the common name for a deep, honking canine cough. Is your dog having bouts of hacking, followed by gagging? Think back a week or so. Was he at the groomer, dog park, obedience class, shelter, or playground? Chances are, he was around another sick dog.


    Kennel cough is highly contagious, but it's not a serious problem on its own. As long as your dog is eating well and acting like himself, he'll probably feel better in a week or so. Your vet should make sure that he doesn’t need antibiotics or cough suppressants.


    Less common causes of coughing include:


    Fungal infections. Yeast and other fungi can be picked up in dirt or through the air. There are prescription medications that can help.
    Heartworms. Mosquitos spread this disease. Monthly medication or an injection that lasts 6 months can prevent it. Treatment is hard on your pet, and expensive.
    Distemper. This virus spreads through the air. It's serious but can be prevented with a yearly vaccine.
    Heart disease. Leaky valves and other problems can weaken and thicken the heart muscle. This puts pressure on the lungs and airways. Medication along with the right diet and exercise can bring relief.
    Lung problems Sometimes dogs get bronchitis or pneumonia. They also may suck in dirt, grass seeds, or food, which can lead to an infection of the airways. Antibiotics can help. In rare cases, lung cancer is the diagnosis. Your vet will help you decide if medication or surgery is the best course.



    When to See the Vet


    Make an appointment with your dog's doctor if:


    His cough lasts more than a week, or worsens
    He seems extra tired
    He has a fever
    He won’t eat
    He has other health problems
    Your vet may ask you some questions like:


    Does your dog have trouble breathing between coughing fits?
    When does he do it? (At night? After eating? After drinking water? After exercise? When he’s excited?)
    What does it sound like? (A goose? A seal?)
    Is the cough dry or moist?
    Does it sound like he's about to vomit?
    Where has your dog been lately? (In a place with other dogs? With you on a family vacation? Around a smoker?)
    Have there been any changes to his daily routine?
    Is he up-to-date on his shots, and heartworm prevention?
    When did he last take his medication?
    Your vet will examine your dog and run tests to find out if the problem is due to a virus, an infection, an allergy, or a different problem. The treatment will depend on the cause.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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