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Thread: Oatmeal Baths?

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    Newbie jordynliyah's Avatar
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    Arrow Oatmeal Baths?

    Hello all,

    One of you mentioned giving an oatmeal bath when I had posted about Vito having an itchy rash last week. The Benadryl helped great for the first 3 days then it seemed to be almost gone after that. Well yesterday and today have been worse than even before and the Benadryl isn't helping at all anymore. Thankfully my poor baby has a dr appt on Monday and I hope they can figure it out :-/ but I was curious if I give him the oatmeal bath do I need to do anything different than giving a human an oatmeal bath?

    Thank you!!
    Alisha

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Hi Alisha, my female Blossom has allergies to chicken and salmon, corn and grains, before I changed her food to Fromm's Beef and now I use Fromm's Lamb and Lentil, she had very itchy skin, that was pink and her ears were pink and warm, she had chin acne or rashes, loose stools, and she always kicked her paws. His all changed after the food change and now she doesn't have any symptoms, even her tear stains have improved. I give my guys 4 natural supplements everyday that help a lot with allergies, the immune system, skin issues and itchiness. I add 2 Tbsps of plain unsweetened yogurt to the morning kibble, this is a great source of Probiotics which aid in digestion, and boost the immune system, I also add 1 Tbsp of apple cider vinegar to their drinking water everyday, there are a lot of benefits to ACV, such as it is a natural anti inflammatory, it kills the bad bacteria in the body, so boosts the immune system, and it balances the Ph levels of the blood. When you boost the immune system, it helps fight infections and allergy symptoms. If you go to the Home Page there is a great article on the many benefits of ACV. I also add an Omega 3 Oil to the evening kibble, you can use cod liver oil, salmon oil, or coconut oil. Omegas are great for the skin, coat, and the brain. I also add Kelp to the evening kibble, kelp also has a lot of health benefits and contains all the vitamins your dog needs. Many times allergies come from the food, which brand and protein source are you currently feeding Vito? Many bullies don't tolerate chicken. An Oatmeal based shampoo is good, we use Petsmarts brand of Puppy Tearless Shampoo, it has Oatmeal and Chamomile, and is gentle and doesn't irritate the eyes. I rinse my guys with warm water and vinegar after I shampoo them. Rinsing them with vinegar leaves their coat really soft, it kills bacteria and parasites like mites, on the skin, it removes the soap residue. And it keeps them smelling nicer for longer in between their baths.



    Dogs itch for many different reasons, and sometimes, for no reason, and it’s not uncommon for the scratching to seem worse at night, when the house is quiet. Every dog’s gotta scratch some time, and that’s completely normal. But when a dog is incessantly licking, scratching, biting and chewing to the point of wounding herself, then scratching becomes a symptom of an underlying pathology.


    The medical term for scratching related to excessive itching is pruritus. This is the second most common reason people take their dogs to the vet (gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhea top the list). The causes of pruritus can be quite complex, but there are two main reasons why dogs itch. The first has to do with the condition of the skin itself: Is it infected? Is it too oily? Is it too dry? Of these three, dry skin is a frequent occurrence. The second major cause of pruritus is allergies.



    Is It Dry Skin?
    One common cause of itching is dry skin. If you live in a region with low humidity, it’s more likely that your dog will have dry skin, which is fairly easy to recognize. When you part your dog’s hair, you see flakes of dandruff in the undercoat, and the skin itself may be cracked and tough. The slightest stimulation of the skin—your gentlest touch—can provoke your dog to scratch violently.


    Dry skin can be influenced not only by environmental factors, but also by diet. Commercial pet foods process out the good oils that contribute to healthy skin and a lustrous haircoat. Dry pet foods have an even more dehydrating effect on skin and hair and also stimulate increased thirst, which only partially compensates for the drying nature of these diets.


    If you must feed dry foods, then by all means add digestive enzymes to your dog’s meals. In fact, digestive enzymes are good to use with any type of food. Enzymes improve the release of nutrients, and beneficial probiotic bacteria also assist in the digestive process. (Probiotics also help with allergies, as noted below.) A healthy digestive system absorbs fluids more readily from the food your dog eats, thus improving hydration and increasing the moisture levels of the skin and haircoat.



    Or Allergies?
    Another common cause of itchy skin is allergies. Allergies may make your dog’s skin dry, greasy, or slightly dry and oily, and are accompanied by frequent scratching, licking or chewing. We are seeing significantly more cases of allergic dogs than we have in the past; many veterinarians believe that we are experiencing an “allergy epidemic.” While the reasons for this allergy epidemic are uncertain, some of the theories put forth include the aggressive vaccination protocols that many dogs have been subjected to, poor breeding practices and the feeding of processed pet foods.


    Whatever the cause, allergies are difficult to address. In the worst cases, afflicted dogs require strong (and potentially toxic) pharmaceuticals just to get some relief. Though allergies are rarely cured, early identification and intervention can keep them under control, and in some cases, can substantially diminish them.


    Clinical research has shown that one important way to reduce the likelihood that dogs will develop allergies is to give them high-potency cultures of beneficial probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus bifidus when they are very young. Probiotics are relatively inexpensive, absolutely safe to use, and can save both dog and the owner tons of grief—and visits to the vet—later in life.


    Regardless of age, many dogs’ allergies are controlled by improving the quality of their diet, giving them high potency acidophilus cultures and high doses of fish oils; adding freshly milled flax seed; and, in some cases, giving them antihistamines. (It can take up to three months for this regimen to take effect.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Thank you for the reply Vikinggirl, we feed him Fromm Puppy Gold Chiot in the pink bag. He is 12 weeks and 1 day old today and we ha what him since he wasn't quite 8 weeks when we got him. He's seemed to be doing great with the food. About 5 days before his rash last week, we had purchased some treats Fromm Four-Star Salmon w/sweet potato and Fromm Four-Star chicken w/carrots and peas.... We started him with the salmon treat for the first 3 days then gave him the chicken treat. We gave him two chicken treats the first day and 1 the second day and that's when I noticed the itching, pink skin, and red bumpy rash. We gave Benadryl for 3 days and he seemed to be doing great until yesterday and then this evening it got worse than ever, with HUGE u mistakable hives all over his neck, tummy, sides, eyes, and back. I took him to emergency care vet and he was given strong doses of steroid intravenously and a take home prescription. We are hoping this isn't a reoccurring thing but will do what it takes to keep my baby healthy. We will definitely add the yogurt, ACV, and salmon oil to his food. Thank you again for the time you took to respond. I will keep you updated on his progress

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Your welcome Alisha. 99% of the time the hives and skin issues are caused by the food. Fromm's puppy is a great food, and is one of the 4 foods we tried with Blossom and Bulldozer, but anything with chicken or salmon, or grains caused the same symptoms you are experiencing with Vito. We were on Royal Canin from the breeder, then we switched to Fromms Puppy Gold, then to Go Natural, back to Royal Canin, but all these foods caused the allergy and skin issues, and also soft serve poops. We took them off chicken and grains, and switched to Fromm's Salmon, but this was even worse, and at the same time we had added salmon oil for the Omega Olils, and Blossom was a mess. We had to give her Benadryl all the time. I took them off all dry kibble and did some home cooking with just ground beef, rice and veggies, and she cleared up. That's when we switched to Fromm's Beef Frittata, and we have been using this flavour for a little over 2 years. They have been doing great on this food, but I had noticed that the paw licking had started again, so I tried another rflavour Fromm's Lamb and Lentil and so far no allergy symptoms at all. It really can be frustrating when you are trying to find a food that's both a food quality and healthy, and also one that they aren't sensitive, or allergic to, and one that they tolerate. It's basically a trial and error process, and one of elimination, until you find the right one. This process can be hard because each time you switch the food, you should do a slow change over two weeks to avoid stomach issues and diarrhea. When switching foods start with 3/4 of the old food mixed with 1/4 of the new food for the first week, then mix 1/2 old food with 1/2 of the new food, and finally 1/4 old food to 3/4 new food, then all new food. You only have to do this if you are switching foods from one brand to a different brand. The great thing about the Fromm's foods, is you don't have to do a slow transition if you are switching to other Fromm's flavours. All of their flavours are interchangeable and you can switch from flavour to,flavour without doing the slow transition. Since you are currently feeding Fromm's Puppy, you could switch to the adult Fromm's Beef, or Lamb and Lentil, their foods are also an All Stages Food, so can be used for Puppies as well. It can take up to a month to see any improvements from a food change. Your treats also contain chicken and salmon, and many store bought treats have a lot of added chemicals and preservatives which can also cause allergy symptoms. The only store bought treats I buy for our guys are the Fruitables, I usually buy Pumpkin and Banana flavour.
    I make my own homemade treats using natural ingredients like yogurt, oatmeal, and peanut butter. You can find many great recipes on line for homemade dog treats. We also give them fruits for treats, I give them strawberries, cut up apples, bananas, ( no grapes, these are toxic to dogs), watermelon, and blueberries. We give them yogurt, peanut butter, a hard boiled egg once or twice a week, you can also give cooked veggies like broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, and green beans. When you are using treats as a training tool, the best thing to use is a few pieces of his own kibble.

    I would hold off on adding anything new until you have successfully switched his food, and determined which one he tolerates, once he's been on the new food and doing well you can start adding the yogurt, the ACV and the Omega Oils. I would stay away from the Samon Oil because he's already had reactions to salmon treats. You can use cod liver oil or Coconut oil instead. There are a lot of health benefits to coconut oil, and it is an excellent source of Omega Oils. Anytime you are adding a new treat, food or treat, and even the fruits and vegetables, just add one at a time for a week, and then add another one, that way if he's allergic or has a reaction to something, you will know right away which food caused the reaction, and you won't have to guess.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Thats great advice!!

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Thank you again Vikinggirl, I really appreciate all of your feedback and your experiences. Vito was on Royal Canin from his breeder as well, then we transitioned him to the Fromm Puppy Gold, and although he never had the skin irritations and hives, his poops have never really been stable. They have mostly been the soft serve as well, and solid maybe 30% of the time, but off and on and never predictable. We will definitely stop giving him the treats. So just to clarify, you think his reaction was due to both the Salmon and Chicken treats? I know it's hard to say since we gave him both within 3 days of each other, but I'm leaning more toward the Chicken treat since that's what he had the day the issues initially began. And considering that Chicken seems to be the main ingredient in his Puppy food, it makes sense that his poops haven't been regular either.

    The On-Call Vet last night doesn't want us to change anything in his diet quite yet, bc he's hoping that with the steroid injection along with the prescription sent home, that it "wipes out" the allergy.... I don't know if that seems logical or not, but he said he wants to wait to see if his symptoms come back. I wanted him to do skin testing right away, so we could get to the route of the problem, but he said that would be the next step if his allergy continues. This Vet was NOT Vito's usual Vet. Since it was after-hours, we got whoever was on-call. I guess the good thing is that Vito has his 12 Week check-up on Monday with HIS Vet and his Vet specializes in Bully's. So I will see if he agrees with what his partner said. I will also hold off adding any of those supplements to his food until further notice. Thank you again. Below are pictures of my poor babe from last night. And I will keep you updated on what we figure out


    -img_0274-jpg-img_0275-jpg

    Alisha

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Hi Alisha, I'm pretty sure that his symptoms are caused by the chicken for sure, and maybe the salmon, a lot of bullies are super sensitive to both, but chicken seems to be the trigger in most of allergy cases. I just figured it out by elimination and trying othe rprotein sources, but if you can do the allergy testing to know 100% that is great. I think his issues are probably more to do with his food and the chicken, but his treats may also be giving him symptoms, because they also contain chicken and salmon, plus store bought treats have lots of preservatives and chemicals in them as well. You can wait to see your vet and see if the steroids help, but if it's a true allergy to his food, the injections aren't going to make the allergy go away, it will help with his symptoms, as will Benadryl, but then he's going to have to be on steroids or antihistamines all the time, which isn't a good thing to do, unless it's absolutely necessary. It would be better to find a food he's not allergic to with limited ingredients and one he tolerates, rather than keep him on the food, as use medications to control the symptoms. It would be best to hold off on giving him new treats or fruits and vegetables until he's more stable and his allergy symptoms have subsided, but you can start giving him the 2 Tbsp of plain yogurt on his morning kibble, as yogurt is a Probiotic which aids in digestion, but also boosts the immune system, this will help Vito by fighting infections and also his allergies.



    Below is an article on the benefits of Probiotics. This article talks about Probiotic pills, but you can get the same effect using store bought yogurt. I also posted the Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Friendly bacteria can play a “best supporting” role in your dog’s digestive health.


    Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that live in the digestive tract. There are a variety of different species belonging to genera that include Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus (often abbreviated by first initial only in names). Some species, such as Lactobacillus, live primarily in the small intestine, while others, such as Bifidobactera, reside in the large intestine (colon).




    Check the expiration date on any probiotic you buy for your dog; if the product doesn’t have one, don’t buy it!


    Benefits: All dogs can benefit from probiotics, which aid digestion and modulate the immune system. Probiotics produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which inhibit the growth and activity of harmful bacteria, such as E. coli, Salmonella, and Clostridium perfringens, as well as providing other benefits to the intestines. Human studies have documented the effectiveness of certain strains in treating diarrhea, irritable bowel, and intestinal inflammation (fewer studies have been conducted on dogs). Probiotics may help prevent urinary tract infections, and can even reduce allergic reactions by decreasing intestinal permeability and controlling inflammation.


    Species with specific strains known to benefit dogs include Enterococcus faecium (strain SF68) and Bacillus coagulans. Bifidobacterium animalis (strain AHC7) has been shown to reduce the time for acute diarrhea to resolve in dogs. Certain strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus improve frequency and quality of stools in sensitive dogs. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) is effective in preventing and treating diarrhea in humans, and may benefit dogs as well. Probiotic products may contain one or several strains.


    Cautions: Some probiotic species require refrigeration in order to remain viable; follow label recommendations for storage. It’s questionable how many survive passage through stomach acid into the digestive tract, and whether they then colonize or must be continually replenished.


    Many products, particularly those that are not refrigerated, contain fewer live organisms than their labels claim. Freeze-dried probiotics may last longer than refrigerated or other powdered products, especially if the powder is exposed to moisture (such as when the container is opened and closed). Probiotics in commercial foods may not survive processing or storage. Probiotic products should always provide an expiration date.


    Dosage: Probiotics are measured by colony forming units (CFUs). Few studies have been done to determine effective dosages, but these numbers are usually in the hundreds of millions or higher. If probiotics are being used to help with digestion, they should be taken with meals, but otherwise they may survive better if given between meals, particularly if taken with liquid that helps to dilute stomach acid and move them more quickly into the digestive tract (maybe give them after your dog takes a big drink). Probiotics may be given short-term or long-term.


    When using products intended for dogs, follow label suggestions for dosage. When using human products, give the full dosage to dogs weighing 40 pounds or more. Reduce the dosage for smaller dogs or if you see loose stools.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits:



    Apple cider is known around the world as Mother Nature’s miracle medicine, a powerful weapon in the war against aging and disease that is more effective than many high-priced prescription drugs. When God created this fruit He designed it be a food and a medicine!


    Apple cider vinegar (ACV) is golden liquid concentrated with the healthy goodness of apples. It contains more than 30 important nutrients, 12 minerals, over 6 vitamins, essential acids and several enzymes. Moreover, it has a large dose of pectin for a healthy heart, and thus, healthy as a whole.


    Many vitamins, minerals and other nutrients and substances are available in ACV to improve the health of your dog. ACV can provide them with enzymes and important minerals, such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, chlorine,
    phosphorus, iron, silicon and other trace minerals. The vitamins contained in ACV are bioflavonoids (vitamin P), beta-carotene (precursor to vitamin A), vitamin C, E, B1, B2, and B6. Tannins from the crushed cell walls of fresh apples as well as malic acid, tartaric acid, propionic acid, acetic acid and pectin (fiber) are also contained in ACV.


    ACV is cheap, easy to use and it really benefits our health in numerous ways. ACV can benefit both people and their pets. It is antibacterial and anti-fungal and gives the immune system a good boost. As a high potassium electrolyte balancer, it remineralizes the body and helps normalizethe blood’s alkaline acid balance.ACV is the natural king of skin remedies. It is wonderful for itching and scratching pets as well as a superb skin and hair conditioner. Good old apple cider vinegar either straight or diluted 50/50 with water can be applied directly to the affected area and allowed to dry. It will kill bacteria on hot spots, eliminate dandruff, rejuvenate hair, skin and help sweeten and balance the pH levels in the body. When giving your dpg a bath, shampoo, rinse, then apply ACV either straight or diluted, followed by rinsing with water. Notice, any residue shampoo will be washed out and you will feel and see an increased softness and sheen to the coat.


    Apple cider vinegar is a powerful detoxifying and purifying agent. It breaks down fatty, mucous and phlegm deposits within the body. By breaking down these substances it improves the health and function of the vital organs, such as the kidneys, bladder and liver, by preventing excessively alkaline urine. Put a tablespoon of ACV in your dog’s drinking water every day and you will no longer have those brown spots in your lawn from the dog’s urine.


    This powerful potion also promotes digestion, assimilation and elimination, all the while neutralizing any toxic substances that enter the body. Cider vinegar has been found to ..neutralize any harmful bacteria that may be found in certain foods. While dogs and cats do not have to worry too much about the bacteria in raw meat, if YOU are in doubt, you can pour a little Apple Cider Vinegar over thier raw meal.


    Cider vinegar can also be beneficial for symptoms such as tooth decay and splitting of your dog’s toenails, which can be symptoms of potassium deficiency. Potassium is essential for the replacement of worn-out tissues within the body. This mineral is also important to soft tissue repair, as calcium is to the bones and teeth which makes it a wonderful supplement for senior dogs.


    Tests have proven that when potassium, in the form of cider vinegar is fed to livestock their appearance improves and their stamina increases.


    Cider vinegar is thought to be beneficial in the treatment of arthritis, as a supplement added to your pet’s daily water supply (or poured over the food) or with compresses soaked in hot vinegar applied directly to the joints. It is also thought to be helpful when used to treat allergies, osteoporosis, cancer, candida, high cholesterol, constipation, muscle cramps, colitis, diabetes, diarrhea, depression, dizziness, ear discharge, eczema, fatigue, kidney stones, kidney and bladder problems, metabolism, and stiff joints.


    The supplementation of ACV has been known to naturally remove red tear stains from the inside out. It is also used by many to prevent fleas when used in a rinse for the dog’s coat.


    Recently, Dr. Louis Ducarre of Geneva, Switzerland, author of the fairly new book,Natural Cures, Natural Life states that when mixed with honey, apple cider becomes potent enough to cure cancer, heart disease and other deadly ailments .


    Natural apple cider vinegar is found in health food stores. It should be a rich amber color with the “mother” quite visible as sentiment on the bottom. The strength of vinegar is important. All varieties of vinegar contain about 4 to 7 percent acetic acid, with 5 percent being the most common amount. Acetic acid is what gives vinegar its tart and sour taste.


    There is nothing beneficial about commercial distilled vinegars except for pickling, cleaning and disinfection —they have no health value!
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    This could also be a contact allergy. Could be laundry soap, shampoo, ect. Looks like the rash my sin had a few months ago when I washed his fleece blanket in cheap laundry detergent , it was a chemical reaction to his sweat.

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vikinggirl View Post
    ...many dogs’ allergies are controlled by improving the quality of their diet, giving them high potency acidophilus cultures and high doses of fish oils; adding freshly milled flax seed; and, in some cases, giving them antihistamines. (It can take up to three months for this regimen to take effect.
    Thank you for sharing your tips. How much freshly milled flax seed is appropriate to give? I just started giving our 3 year old 35 lb mini bulldog (adopted this week) a teaspoon (measured after grinding) daily to help her dry/allergic skin. I mix it with a tiny bit natural peanut butter to make several tiny "treats." She loves it and her stool is still nicely formed, but I wondered if I could give her another serving later in the day and/or if this small amount is not enough to make a difference.

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Hi Minibull, flaxseed was mentioned in the article as a source of Omega 3 Fatty Acids, I don't use flaxseed with my guys, so am not sure how much to feed. I give my guys 1 Tbsp of Coconut Oil, instead for the Omegas. You can also use salmon oil, or Cod Liver Oil. I also add 2 Tbsps of plain yogurt to their morning kibble for the probiotics, 1 Tbsp of apple cider vinegar in their drinking water everyday, you can also put it in their kibble, if they don't like it, or don't drink all their water. And I also give them 1 tsp. of powdered pet kelp. Kelp contains all the vitamins and minerals your dog will ever need.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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    Default Re: Oatmeal Baths?

    Thanks for your tips, Vikinggirl! I have some coconut oil and will try it! I might try in addition to the flaxseed as I thought the coconut doesn't have any omega-3 fatty acids but does have medium chain fatty acids. Our girl also seems to love avocado and so far her digestion is doing well with it plus the flaxseed. I hope the dietary changes reduce her skin problems over time!

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