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Thread: adult vaginitis

  1. #1
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    Default adult vaginitis

    Soooo, I am an idiot Most of you know Bertha has occasional problems with UTI but they are becomign less frequent. The best medicine for her is Clavamox for 3 weeks. Well, about 3 weeks after a round of Clavamox, she was incontinent of urine x2. Very unlike her and this usually makes her hide in the closet, etc. So I take a clean catch urine to the vet and of course there are some WBC, etc since not sterile but nothing to be real alarmed. So, we start worrying about stones, polyps etc again. Ultrasound done and was perfect except the bladder wall seems a little thicker. We were unable to get a sterile UA that day so I took her back last week and got the results yesterday no UA. However, in the meantime, she has had dribblings of blood, here and there, and will do the butt scoot occasionally. I clean her with Mal-a-ket wipes or warm clothes frequently. So then the vet suggested "vaginitis" and it hit me like a ton of bricks. When us kin females use antibiotics are normal flora goes off and frequently we get yeast infections, etc. So what is the best treatment for vaginitis? And what pro-biotics should I use or is yogurt sufficent?


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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    Hi, so sorry you are going through this with Bertha, I don't have any experience with this condition, but I looked it up for you, and found information on both traditional antibiotic treatment, and also homeopathic treatments. I hope this helps.


    The most common cause of vaginitis is a bacterial urinary tract infection, which may or may not be the result of constriction of the vagina caused by a conformational abnormality.


    If your dog has a bladder infection, the urine contains lots of bacteria. When the infected urine passes through the vagina, the bacteria can colonize the vagina, leading to inflammation and infection. So in essence, a urinary tract infection can lead to a secondary vaginal infection.


    Another cause of vaginitis in dogs is the presence of urine on the vaginal mucosa, which has a caustic, irritating effect. Since all female dogs urinate by passing urine through the vagina, but not every dog gets vaginitis, it’s assumed there is something abnormal about the urine itself, such as a pH problem, urinary crystals, or a urinary outflow problem.


    In dogs with urinary incontinence, there is chronic leaking of small amounts of urine from the bladder out of the body. The urine may be in contact with the vaginal lining much of the time and lead to urine scalding, tissue inflammation, and a secondary localized infection.


    Vaginitis can also occur from bacteria, yeast and viruses that get transferred to the vagina when a dog cleans herself after pooping. The rectum and vagina are very close in proximity, and cross-contamination can occur through licking the area. Vaginal yeast infections can also occur in dogs who are on prolonged antibiotic therapy or are immunocompromised.


    Other causes of the condition include viral infections (including the herpes virus), foreign bodies in the vagina, trauma to the vagina, vaginal abscesses or tumors, hyperplasia of the vagina, steroid therapy, and zinc poisoning.


    Sometimes in vaginitis, there is inflammation without infection. There can be several causes for this, including sensitivity to a shampoo or other cleaning agent that’s irritating to the vulva. Topical irritation of the vulva from shampoos, detergents, cleaning agents, and other solutions can lead to secondary vaginitis. I actually know of some dog owners who insist on wiping their dog’s vulva after she urinates. The wiping action can induce vaginitis from the constant disinfecting of this very delicate area.


    Female dogs with recessed vulvas can also have recurrent issues with vaginitis. When you look at a female dog from behind, you should be able to see the tip of her vulva hanging down – it’s shaped like an upside-down teardrop. Some dogs that have excessive perivulvar fat or a vulva that is tucked up high, which is called a hooded vulva, can have a predisposition to vaginitis because the surrounding skin creates a ripe environment for secondary yeast and bacterial infections.


    Diagnosing Vaginitis in Dogs


    Diagnostic tests for juvenile and adult-onset vaginitis are the same, and can include a cytologic examination of vaginal discharge and cells of the vagina, vaginal and urine bacterial culture and sensitivity tests, a urinalysis to check for pH issues and urinary crystals, and a manual vaginal exam. A vaginoscopy should also be performed, which involves passing a scope into the vagina to check for abnormalities such as a stricture (narrowing) of the vaginal vault or vaginal septa, which are walls of tissue within the vagina. A vaginoscopy can also assess discharge present in the vagina, vesicular lesions or lymphoid follicles, urine pooling, and polyps, cysts, masses or foreign objects in the vagina.


    A blood chemistry profile, complete blood count and an electrolyte panel will also be run. If the dog has adult-onset vaginitis, she should be tested for canine brucellosis.


    Sometimes x-rays are taken or an ultrasound is performed to look for tumors, foreign bodies, or bladder or tissue changes associated with the cervix or reproductive organs.


    Treatment Options


    Dogs with juvenile or puppy vaginitis usually require no treatment because the condition almost always resolves spontaneously with the first heat. In dogs with vaginitis that will be spayed, it makes sense to wait until after the first estrous cycle to perform the procedure. I don’t recommend spaying puppies with recessed vulvas until they’ve had at least one estrous cycle, which usually completely eliminates the risk of vaginitis.


    Treatment of adult-onset vaginitis depends on the cause. Appropriate antibiotic therapy (based on a culture and sensitivity test) will be given to resolve a bacterial infection in the urinary tract and/or the vagina. It is very important to treat the bacterial infection with the correct antibiotic. Indiscriminate use of antibiotics can promote the growth of additional types of bacteria in the vagina, and can actually exacerbate opportunistic yeast infections.


    If the cause of the vaginitis is urinary incontinence, this condition must be treated first in order to resolve the vaginitis. Treatment for urine dribbling depends on the cause. In spayed female dogs, it is almost always hormone-related.


    If there is systemic disease present such as diabetes or Cushing's, those conditions will require treatment to resolve the vaginitis or prevent a recurrence.


    In all cases of vaginitis, I recommend a broad-spectrum non-diary probiotic be administered to help keep opportunistic bacteria levels in check. If a case of puppy vaginitis turns into a chronic case of adult vaginitis, immunoglobulin testing should be performed to check the dog’s innate immune function. Many dogs with IgA deficiency have recurrent opportunistic infections.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Home Remedies:

    Home Remedies for Prevention


    Home remedies may help to prevent recurrence of your dog's symptoms. Treatment for puppy vaginitis is mainly simple cleansing the area (twice a day) with either baby wipes or a warm washcloth with diluted puppy shampoo (be sure to rinse well). Be sure to minimize your puppy's exposure to toxins, chemicals and pesticides (these can irritate delicate tissue) and keep all bedding clean. Quality nutrition will also help to support healthy immune function and your puppy's ability to fight infection. To help prevent adult vaginitis, it is imperative to maintain a healthy diet and optimal weight; obese dogs can develop folds over the vulva, which can create a perfect breeding ground for bacteria. Keeping the hair around the genitals clipped will help along with keeping a watchful eye for any plant materials that could enter the vagina.


    Home Remedies for Treatment
    Treating an active infection on your own can definitely be effective, but it is important to note that if your dog is experiencing severe symptoms and/or does not improve with home treatment, contact your vet for further guidance and treatment options. The goal is twofold: to kill the bacteria causing the condition and to reduce inflammation. There are homeopathic solutions for killing bacteria like tea tree oil (which has both antiseptic and antibacterial properties).


    Tea tree oil should be used topically, and always dilute it to avoid irritating the skin (dilute 1 tsp. of tea tree oil in 1 cup of water). Apply externally to the affected area.


    Echinacea is widely considered to be a safe supplement that boosts the immune system and can be quite useful in treating bacterial infections. Probiotics (like lactobacillus or acidophilus) are healthy bacteria that can aid in preventing the overgrowth of bad bacteria. Other herbs like marshmallow, myrrh, goldenseal, black cohosh, Coptic, calendula, gossyplum and comfrey leaf have been recommended to use as part of a douche (twice daily) or sitz bath.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    yogurt should do it
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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    thank you, @2BullyMama and @Vikinggirl What a 2 edged sword, clean to prevent uti's but cleaning can cause inflammation. sheesh!! Christine, do you think this would cause the slight dribbling of blood, not frank blood but maybe serosanguinous fluid?


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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    Quote Originally Posted by agingermom View Post
    thank you, @2BullyMama and @Vikinggirl What a 2 edged sword, clean to prevent uti's but cleaning can cause inflammation. sheesh!! Christine, do you think this would cause the slight dribbling of blood, not frank blood but maybe serosanguinous fluid?
    Sure can.... banks had a heck of an issue until about 1 1/2.... Once we did the vulvaplasty , her UTI issues disappeared
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
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    e.

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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    I'm of no help with this one but I know @Casper has had some issues with his vagina in the past
    @ddnene @pdolphin27

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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    Quote Originally Posted by Chumley View Post
    I'm of no help with this one but I know @Casper has had some issues with his vagina in the past
    @ddnene @pdolphin27
    Oh you didn't just go there… LMAO!!!

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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    Quote Originally Posted by Chumley View Post
    I'm of no help with this one but I know @Casper has had some issues with his vagina in the past
    @ddnene @pdolphin27


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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    Quote Originally Posted by Chumley View Post
    I'm of no help with this one but I know @Casper has had some issues with his vagina in the past
    @ddnene @pdolphin27

    Well yes @Chumley, I do have some experience with the female sex organ, I do have two wonderful, beautiful daughters, and since i'm now single instead of married like you, my experience probably isn't as limited as yours, So.... what is it you need to know Chumley???

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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    Quote Originally Posted by Vikinggirl View Post
    Hi, so sorry you are going through this with Bertha, I don't have any experience with this condition, but I looked it up for you, and found information on both traditional antibiotic treatment, and also homeopathic treatments. I hope this helps.


    The most common cause of vaginitis is a bacterial urinary tract infection, which may or may not be the result of constriction of the vagina caused by a conformational abnormality.


    If your dog has a bladder infection, the urine contains lots of bacteria. When the infected urine passes through the vagina, the bacteria can colonize the vagina, leading to inflammation and infection. So in essence, a urinary tract infection can lead to a secondary vaginal infection.


    Another cause of vaginitis in dogs is the presence of urine on the vaginal mucosa, which has a caustic, irritating effect. Since all female dogs urinate by passing urine through the vagina, but not every dog gets vaginitis, it’s assumed there is something abnormal about the urine itself, such as a pH problem, urinary crystals, or a urinary outflow problem.


    In dogs with urinary incontinence, there is chronic leaking of small amounts of urine from the bladder out of the body. The urine may be in contact with the vaginal lining much of the time and lead to urine scalding, tissue inflammation, and a secondary localized infection.


    Vaginitis can also occur from bacteria, yeast and viruses that get transferred to the vagina when a dog cleans herself after pooping. The rectum and vagina are very close in proximity, and cross-contamination can occur through licking the area. Vaginal yeast infections can also occur in dogs who are on prolonged antibiotic therapy or are immunocompromised.


    Other causes of the condition include viral infections (including the herpes virus), foreign bodies in the vagina, trauma to the vagina, vaginal abscesses or tumors, hyperplasia of the vagina, steroid therapy, and zinc poisoning.


    Sometimes in vaginitis, there is inflammation without infection. There can be several causes for this, including sensitivity to a shampoo or other cleaning agent that’s irritating to the vulva. Topical irritation of the vulva from shampoos, detergents, cleaning agents, and other solutions can lead to secondary vaginitis. I actually know of some dog owners who insist on wiping their dog’s vulva after she urinates. The wiping action can induce vaginitis from the constant disinfecting of this very delicate area.


    Female dogs with recessed vulvas can also have recurrent issues with vaginitis. When you look at a female dog from behind, you should be able to see the tip of her vulva hanging down – it’s shaped like an upside-down teardrop. Some dogs that have excessive perivulvar fat or a vulva that is tucked up high, which is called a hooded vulva, can have a predisposition to vaginitis because the surrounding skin creates a ripe environment for secondary yeast and bacterial infections.


    Diagnosing Vaginitis in Dogs


    Diagnostic tests for juvenile and adult-onset vaginitis are the same, and can include a cytologic examination of vaginal discharge and cells of the vagina, vaginal and urine bacterial culture and sensitivity tests, a urinalysis to check for pH issues and urinary crystals, and a manual vaginal exam. A vaginoscopy should also be performed, which involves passing a scope into the vagina to check for abnormalities such as a stricture (narrowing) of the vaginal vault or vaginal septa, which are walls of tissue within the vagina. A vaginoscopy can also assess discharge present in the vagina, vesicular lesions or lymphoid follicles, urine pooling, and polyps, cysts, masses or foreign objects in the vagina.


    A blood chemistry profile, complete blood count and an electrolyte panel will also be run. If the dog has adult-onset vaginitis, she should be tested for canine brucellosis.


    Sometimes x-rays are taken or an ultrasound is performed to look for tumors, foreign bodies, or bladder or tissue changes associated with the cervix or reproductive organs.


    Treatment Options


    Dogs with juvenile or puppy vaginitis usually require no treatment because the condition almost always resolves spontaneously with the first heat. In dogs with vaginitis that will be spayed, it makes sense to wait until after the first estrous cycle to perform the procedure. I don’t recommend spaying puppies with recessed vulvas until they’ve had at least one estrous cycle, which usually completely eliminates the risk of vaginitis.


    Treatment of adult-onset vaginitis depends on the cause. Appropriate antibiotic therapy (based on a culture and sensitivity test) will be given to resolve a bacterial infection in the urinary tract and/or the vagina. It is very important to treat the bacterial infection with the correct antibiotic. Indiscriminate use of antibiotics can promote the growth of additional types of bacteria in the vagina, and can actually exacerbate opportunistic yeast infections.


    If the cause of the vaginitis is urinary incontinence, this condition must be treated first in order to resolve the vaginitis. Treatment for urine dribbling depends on the cause. In spayed female dogs, it is almost always hormone-related.


    If there is systemic disease present such as diabetes or Cushing's, those conditions will require treatment to resolve the vaginitis or prevent a recurrence.


    In all cases of vaginitis, I recommend a broad-spectrum non-diary probiotic be administered to help keep opportunistic bacteria levels in check. If a case of puppy vaginitis turns into a chronic case of adult vaginitis, immunoglobulin testing should be performed to check the dog’s innate immune function. Many dogs with IgA deficiency have recurrent opportunistic infections.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Home Remedies:

    Home Remedies for Prevention


    Home remedies may help to prevent recurrence of your dog's symptoms. Treatment for puppy vaginitis is mainly simple cleansing the area (twice a day) with either baby wipes or a warm washcloth with diluted puppy shampoo (be sure to rinse well). Be sure to minimize your puppy's exposure to toxins, chemicals and pesticides (these can irritate delicate tissue) and keep all bedding clean. Quality nutrition will also help to support healthy immune function and your puppy's ability to fight infection. To help prevent adult vaginitis, it is imperative to maintain a healthy diet and optimal weight; obese dogs can develop folds over the vulva, which can create a perfect breeding ground for bacteria. Keeping the hair around the genitals clipped will help along with keeping a watchful eye for any plant materials that could enter the vagina.


    Home Remedies for Treatment
    Treating an active infection on your own can definitely be effective, but it is important to note that if your dog is experiencing severe symptoms and/or does not improve with home treatment, contact your vet for further guidance and treatment options. The goal is twofold: to kill the bacteria causing the condition and to reduce inflammation. There are homeopathic solutions for killing bacteria like tea tree oil (which has both antiseptic and antibacterial properties).


    Tea tree oil should be used topically, and always dilute it to avoid irritating the skin (dilute 1 tsp. of tea tree oil in 1 cup of water). Apply externally to the affected area.


    Echinacea is widely considered to be a safe supplement that boosts the immune system and can be quite useful in treating bacterial infections. Probiotics (like lactobacillus or acidophilus) are healthy bacteria that can aid in preventing the overgrowth of bad bacteria. Other herbs like marshmallow, myrrh, goldenseal, black cohosh, Coptic, calendula, gossyplum and comfrey leaf have been recommended to use as part of a douche (twice daily) or sitz bath.
    Quote Originally Posted by Casper View Post
    Well yes @Chumley, I do have some experience with the female sex organ, I do have two wonderful, beautiful daughters, and since i'm now single instead of married like you, my experience probably isn't as limited as yours, So.... what is it you need to know Chumley???
    Dave I know @Chumley was asking but since you are a vagina expert, could you please put the above post into a NUTshell for me?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    Quote Originally Posted by pdolphin27 View Post
    Dave I know @Chumley was asking but since you are a vagina expert, could you please put the above post into a NUTshell for me?

    Sure Phil.... I am what I eat, and Yogurt dang sure isn't one of them..... Hope this helps!! Roflmao.

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    Default Re: adult vaginitis

    Quote Originally Posted by Casper View Post
    Sure Phil.... I am what I eat, and Yogurt dang sure isn't one of them..... Hope this helps!! Roflmao.
    oh man, you slay me Dave!

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