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Thread: HGE/Gastroenteritis

  1. #1
    Rescue Volunteer Rural mystic's Avatar
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    Default HGE/Gastroenteritis

    This is a question for a friend and coworker.
    A few months ago a coworker and his girlfriend adopted a pitbull from the shelter.
    The dog was basically house trained and they experienced very little behavior or other issues with the dog.
    Recently the dog has not been able to maintain its regular potty schedule and has at times difficulty eliminating and has gone several times in the home.
    The feces range from normal but on the soft side to runny with traces of blood and mucus.
    The Vet diagnosed the dog as having Hemorrlogic Gastroenteritis or HGE.
    The dog was given a round of antibiotics and placed on a bland diet.
    The dog has finished the antibiotics but although somewhat better is still having difficulty holding its bowels and when outside sometimes going several times in a short period and often straining without passing anything.
    They plan on returning to the vet if the situation continues. I have recommended yogurt or probiotics to help restore the good bacteria in the stomach and intestines
    from the round of antibiotics but have no other suggestions as I am not familiar with this condition.

    My question: Has anyone in the forum experience with this with your dog or someone you know and how was it treated? How successful was the treatment? And how long did the problem continue and any helpful remedies that may prevent future occurrences.

  2. #2
    Rescue Volunteer Rural mystic's Avatar
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    Default Re: HGE/Gastroenteritis

    I guess most everybody here is like me, I didn't know a dang thang about it. I told my friend I would post in the forum for some advice etc cause there is always the chance that if its health related a Bully somewhere has experienced it. Maybe this is one of those rare things that Bullies don't much have a problem with

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    Default Re: HGE/Gastroenteritis

    Never heard of it, but sounds similar to colitis


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    Default Re: HGE/Gastroenteritis

    Dogs with HGE will appear profoundly ill and, if left untreated, may die. In most cases, the disorder appears to run its course in a few days if the animal is given appropriate supportive care. Intravenous therapy given at the veterinary hospital provides the cornerstone of therapy for HGE. Fluids given under the skin (subcutaneous fluids) are generally not considered adequate to meet the significant fluid requirements of most dogs with HGE.

    If intravenous fluid therapy is not given, the dog's red blood count will continue to elevate. Eventually, the blood may become so thick that it flows very slowly through the blood vessels. In this situation, the dog is at risk for a potentially fatal clotting disorder called DIC. Once DIC has begun, it is often irreversible and often leads to death of the animal.

    Additional therapy may include antibiotics and anti-ulcer medication.

    Prognosis

    The prognosis is usually good for complete recovery. A small number of dogs will have a later recurrence of the disorder.

    Transmission to Humans

    Canine HGE poses no known health risk to humans.

    Prevention
    [replacer_a]

    accchealth.org/HGE.html‎
    Because the cause is unknown, there is no recommended preventive therapy.
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