Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 13 to 22 of 22

Thread: Fergus has Kennel Cough

  1. #13
    Doggie Boutique Owner Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Ashleym's Avatar
    Location
    So. Calif.
    Posts
    848
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Fergus
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    Quote Originally Posted by sheshistory View Post
    Any specific reason you are against getting your bully an antibiotic since it sounds like it's a case of kennel cough and antibiotics are the most effective treatment?

    Just curious!
    Not against it just hate to over medicate

  2. #14
    Pooper scooper
    Country
    USA
    Posts
    11,226
    Bulldog(s) Names
    7
    Trophies
    Likes (Received)
    2232

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    Buster had kennel cough that turned into pneumonia right when he was turning 4 months, we thought we were going to lose him. If it wasn't for his lady vet i'm convinced we would have. He was in that vet office every week that month.. Scares me that it will affect him latter on down the road. Lots of good advice here.

  3. #15
    Owner/Administrator Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    bullmama's Avatar
    Real Name
    Lisa
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    25,362
    Bulldog(s) Names
    The Home of the Desert Sky Pack
    Trophies
    Likes (Received)
    2312
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    Quote Originally Posted by sheshistory View Post
    Oooh, kennel cough is a beast with a bulldog.

    Although you'd like to avoid an antibiotic, in this case, I really would not mess around. Since upper-respiratory infections can be so troublesome for bulldogs AND lead to lower-respiratory infections (like pnuemonia, which can be deadly for a bully), it's really important to have your bully treated immediately.

    I say this because I was in a similar situation: I had vaccinated both of my bullies against kennel cough, they went to day care, Linus started getting a cough...I figured it couldn't be, because I vaccinated them. So I waited. Well, it was kennel cough and my delay in bringing Linus to the vet nearly created a situation where Linus' lungs were infected by the bacteria...so really worth getting to the vet and getting on that antibiotic, which cleared it right up.
    While I absolutely hate antibiotics for every little thing, I agree completely with @sheshistory I would not mess around with kennel cough if that is what is needed. If you choose to go with the home remedy approach I would have his chest examined by your vet every few days to make certain it has not moved into the lungs.

    Everyday is a party when you own a bulldog!
    CLICK HERE to Sponsor a rescue Bulldog!

  4. #16
    Norwegian Rose Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Vikinggirl's Avatar
    Real Name
    Monica
    Country
    Canada
    Location
    Burlington, ON Canada
    Posts
    9,639
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Bulldozer and Blossom
    Likes (Received)
    2119

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    How to Treat Kennel Cough


    Kennel Cough, or infectious tracheobronchitis, is a highly contagious upper respiratory problem in dogs. In general, kennel cough is a term used to describe a condition called Infectious Tracheobronchitis. The most common types of agents that cause kennel cough are parainfluenza virus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and mycoplasma. Major contributors are canine adenovirus 2, reovirux and canine herpes virus, but the parainfluenza is the most prevalent.



    Steps
    1
    Know if your dog actually has it. How do you know if the dog actually has the virus? Get a professional diagnosis. Some common symptoms include:
    Gagging spells that appear to be choking but is actually coughing.
    Vomiting clear fluid which isn't indigestion.
    2
    Make sure your dog doesn't actually have something stuck in its throat and mistake it for kennel cough. Check by opening the dog's mouth and peering down the esophagus carefully. For safety measures with dogs that are a bit aggressive, consult a vet as soon as possible.
    3
    Take your dog to the veterinarian. You will see key signs telling you whether your dog is coming down with a secondary sickness. You should keep an eye on your furry friend, making sure that he/she does not become lethargic, stops eating, or has discharge coming from the nose and eyes. You may need to go get medication from your vet. You may get antibiotics such as Azithromycin for the bacterial infection. It is a lot easier for a pup that is 6 months old or younger to get a secondary sickness than those that are older, so it is suggested to not take a chance with your young pup and take him/her to the vet upon signs of kennel cough.
    4
    The veterinarian may suggest that you help suppress the cough. Ask the veterinarian if giving the dog a spoonful of children's RobitussinDM would be beneficial (about 1 tsp for every 20 pounds of animal weight). Never give human medication to your pet without discussing it with your veterinarian. Administering the wrong dosage or ingesting certain active ingredients in drugs may cause serious health problems.
    5
    Bring your dog in the bathroom with you while you take a shower (not in the shower), and letting him breathe in the steam can help soothe the cough as well.
    6
    Boost the dog's immune system. You can also speed up the healing process by giving your dog ground Vitamin C tabs in the water. Wild Berry Bark, Peppermint, Raw Honey, Yerba Santa can be used under a vet supervision.


    If your dog is hacking away or constantly making noises that make it sound like he's choking on something, he may have a case of kennel cough, or canine infectious tracheobronchitis. Although kennel cough can sound terrible, most of the time it is not a serious condition, and most dogs will recover without treatment.


    What is Kennel Cough?


    Just as human colds may be caused by many different viruses, kennel cough itself can have multiple causes. One of the most common culprits is a bacterium called Bordetella bronchiseptica m-- which is why kennel cough is often called Bordetella. Most dogs that become infected with Bordetella are infected with a virus at the same time. These viruses, which are known to make dogs more susceptible to contracting Bordetella infection, include canine adenovirus, canine distemper virus, canine herpes virus, parainfluenza virus and canine reovirus.


    Dogs "catch" kennel cough when they inhale bacteria or virus particles into their respiratory tract. This tract is normally lined with a coating of mucus that traps infectious particles, but there are a number of factors that can weaken this protection and make dogs prone to kennel cough infection, which results in inflammation of the larynx (voice box) and trachea (windpipe).


    These factors include:


    Exposure to crowded and/or poorly ventilated conditions, such as are found in many kennels and shelters
    Cold temperatures
    Exposure to dust and/or cigarette smoke
    Travel-induced stress





    Symptoms of Kennel Cough


    The classic symptom of kennel cough is a persistent, forceful cough. This is distinct from a cough-like sound made by some dogs, especially little ones, which is called a reverse sneeze. Reverse sneezes can be normal in certain dogs and breeds, and usually only indicates the presence of post-nasal drip or a slight irritation of the throat.


    Some dogs with kennel cough may show other symptoms of illness, including sneezing, a runny nose, or eye discharge.


    If your dog has kennel cough, he probably will not lose his appetite or have a decreased energy level.


    Treating and Preventing Kennel Cough


    Kennel cough is contagious. If you think your dog might have the condition, you should keep him away from other animals and contact your veterinarian.


    Although most cases of kennel cough will resolve without treatment, medications may speed recovery or minimize symptoms during the course of infection. These include antibiotics that target Bordetella bacteria and cough medicines.


    You may also find that keeping your dog in a well-humidified area and using a harness instead of a collar, especially for dogs that strain against a leash, will minimize the coughing.


    Most dogs with kennel cough recover completely within three weeks, though it can take up to six weeks in older dogs or those with other medical conditions. Because serious, ongoing kennel cough infection can lead to pneumonia, be sure to follow up with your veterinarian if your dog doesn't improve within the expected amount of time. Also, if your dog at any time has symptoms of rapid breathing, not eating, or listlessness, contact your vet right away, as these could be signs of more serious conditions.



    here are some natural remedies, these are not meant to replace antibiotics or vet care, as kennel cough can quickly turn to pneumonia. But these natural remedies will help ease symptoms and keep Fergus more comfortable.

    1. Esberitox which is a fast acting Echinacea

    2. Vitamin C - a natural anti viral, and Vitamin E - supports immune system

    3. Oregano Oil - a natural antiseptic, anti fungal and antibacterial

    4. Raw Garlic- but be careful not to give too much, as garlic can be toxic to dogs

    5. Raw Honey - will ease coughing and congestion

    6. Slippery Elm -

    7. Essential Oils - soothes sore throats and to ease breathing, oil of Eucalyptus,
    Lavendar Oil, and tea tree oil

    8. Chamomile - has a calming effect


    I hope this helps you, and that Fergus feels better soon. Sending love, hugs, and prayers for Fergus and you.
    Last edited by Vikinggirl; 08-22-2013 at 07:34 PM.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

  5. #17
    Doggie Boutique Owner Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Ashleym's Avatar
    Location
    So. Calif.
    Posts
    848
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Fergus
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    Quote Originally Posted by desertskybulldogs View Post
    While I absolutely hate antibiotics for every little thing, I agree completely with @sheshistory I would not mess around with kennel cough if that is what is needed. If you choose to go with the home remedy approach I would have his chest examined by your vet every few days to make certain it has not moved into the lungs.
    Thanks Lisa. My lab never had kennel cough and he is 6 yrs old so its awesome I have such a great support group to go to for advise. Made me realize how serious this is for a bully and I will be sure to administer the antibiotics.

  6. #18
    Rescue Volunteer Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    DudleysMom's Avatar
    Real Name
    Kathleen
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Pennsauken, NJ
    Posts
    1,548
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Dudley, 12/26/2010-2/8/16; currently I have Kia, 7 yo femaie
    Likes (Received)
    64

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    Poor Fergus. I have nothing to offer, I've never had to deal with it, but Dudley and I send our sympathy and best wishes! Hugs to Fergus. I love that photo of him. I just want to hug him!

    Dogs have a way of finding the people who need them...
    Filling an emptiness we don't even know we have. -- Thom Jones

  7. #19
    The Ultimate Sourmug Sherry's Avatar
    Real Name
    Sherry Daye S.
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Denver PA
    Posts
    5,284
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Jack , Dolly, Grizz, Peggy Sue, and Scrimps
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashleym View Post
    Thanks Lisa. My lab never had kennel cough and he is 6 yrs old so its awesome I have such a great support group to go to for advise. Made me realize how serious this is for a bully and I will be sure to administer the antibiotics.

    Sorry I'm late to the thread, you're on top of it. and yes I love the whole dog journal too. one of my favorite go to's for ideas
    Hope he's better in no time at all. sometimes you gotta give in to the meds. this is one of those times
    Life is like a box of chocolate covered

  8. #20
    Bonnaroo bound in my bulldog batmobile Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    mcraven2's Avatar
    Real Name
    Melissa
    Country
    United States
    Location
    Boston MA
    Posts
    1,521
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Giovanni, Princess, and Diva (Frenchie)
    Likes (Received)
    0
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    I have nothing to add since non of mine have had it but I agree with the others, antibiotics sounds like the way to go to prevent any other infection. Good luck to you and Fergus! Keep us posted with everything!
    Princess, Diva, and Gio <3

  9. #21
    Newbie RedmondLiving's Avatar
    Location
    Redmond WA
    Posts
    12
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Bella
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    Just today on PetMd was an article on Kennel Cough http://www.petmd.com/dog/general-hea...k#.UharxTnn_IV. Certainly your Vet knows the best treatment for Fergus and we wish him a speedy recover! This article offers a little insight on treatment, prevention & causes. Best of luck!

  10. #22
    Feed Store Operator
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    739
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Duchess
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default Re: Fergus has Kennel Cough

    My mom lives in Iowa and her Akita is just getting over kennel cough - her vet told her they have seen more case this year than in the past and it has been a "mutant" strain that has required heavier antibiotics.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •