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Thread: "Pano" advice needed

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    Default "Pano" advice needed

    Hi,

    I am new to the forum and new to English Bulldogs, I am trying to make sure my bully gets the best care because its only since I got him I have discovered the problems they can have. Recently my 17 month old male bulldog has developed an occasional limp, it seems to move from his left to right front legs and seems worse when he gets up from rest/sleeping and, worse of all, his leg sometimes seems to give way as he walks yet he has no problem at all running and jumping.

    I have taken him to the vet twice now, the first time the vet could not find anything wrong after examination, the second he thought his left leg was a little swollen and gave us an anti-inflammatory liquid to apply to his leg. The leg has got no better after nearly a week of being treated with this liquid so I started to research possible causes and thats when I found the term "pano".

    I am going to ask the vet this weekend to look for early on set of arthritis and also rule out lyme disease but I believe from what I have read that it looks like "pano", I would very much appreciate replies from owners who's bulldogs have had "pano" and how they treated it? is the dog in a lot of pain from it? and how long did it take to disappear?

    Thanks in advance.
    Mark

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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    I have no experience with it, but will tag a few members that might have some insight.
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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    I don't have any experience with this, but I do know that sometimes when they are young and play hard they can pull a muscle or injure a joint and it usually will heal itself. But since yours is lasting longer that a few days, he may have something else going on and only a good bully vet and an x-ray will be able to see what is going on.
    Have a Great Bully Day.
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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    We had a Dobie that was diagnosed with this..it's a mystery disease to me..our Dobie had been diagnosed with Von Willebrand Disease which is found in large breed dogs. It's a marrow disease, a blood clotting disease..where the Pano seems to exist too. As it turned out..the diagnosis of Von Willebrand was incorrect and as our Dobie outgrew the pain, the diagnosis settled on Pano. We were also told high protein food can exasperate this..but not always. Look on it as growing pains, much like kids get. It's real and it hurts..but they only can treat the pain. Our Dobie was huge..115 pound girl and grew extremely fast. Bully's growth cycle is so much slower, I am surprised he got it. But..these guys surprise me every day! Our Dobie was Xrayed and they could see cloudiness in the marrow but no lesions. Much like arthritis looks..the good news is..Fergie will outgrow this..but it does hurt.
    Last edited by JAKEISGREAT; 04-17-2013 at 10:28 AM.

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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    I have been going through alot with my bully limping on his left front leg and have had SEVERAL visits to the vet, they did check for Pano on the x-ray but he did not have it - after several x-rays and then MRI's they determined he has a strain/sprain. I would suggest an x-ray as it does sound like Pano where it affects multiple legs. My vet said if he limps, he's in pain so they can recommend something for you for that. Best of luck, lets us know.
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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    Hi, I looked this up for you, and copied and pasted it, from what I read Pano is basically growing pains in dogs, it is common up to 18 months of age, and then they outgrow it, treatment is usually anti inflammatories. You could also try some natural remedies such as massaging and rubbing his legs, maybe some heating pads wrapped in a towel on his legs, and I give my guys a Tbsp of apple cider vinegar in their drinking water everyday, there are a lot of benefits to apple cider vinegar. One of them is it is a natural anti inflammatory, so may help with inflammation in his limbs. It won't hurt as its a natural remedy, also salmon oil is good, and an be added to their kibble, or you can give it in a capsule form. I'll copy and paste the benefits of apple cider vinegar for you as well. Hope this helps.


    Benefits of Apple cider vinegar
    Current Article


    http://www.VeterinaryPartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=3238


    By Singing The Praises Of Apple Cider Vinegar on Jul 6, 2008 in Dr.Jeannie, Dog Health - Immune System, Dog Breeders Corner, Dog Heart Health, Dog Nutrition, Doggone Home & Garden Stuff


    Apple Cider Vinegar


    Apple cider is known around the world as Mother Nature’s miracle medicine, a powerful weapon in the war against aging and disease that is more effective than many high-priced prescription drugs. When God created this fruit He designed it be a food and a medicine!
    Apple cider vinegar (ACV) is golden liquid concentrated with the healthy goodness of apples. It contains more than 30 important nutrients, 12 minerals, over 6 vitamins, essential acids and several enzymes. Moreover, it has a large dose of pectin for a healthy heart, and thus, healthy as a whole.
    Many vitamins, minerals and other nutrients and substances are available in ACV to improve the health of your dog. ACV can provide them with enzymes and important minerals, such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, chlorine,
    phosphorus, iron, silicon and other trace minerals. The vitamins contained in ACV are bioflavonoids (vitamin P), beta-carotene (precursor to vitamin A), vitamin C, E, B1, B2, and B6. Tannins from the crushed cell walls of fresh apples as well as malic acid, tartaric acid, propionic acid, acetic acid and pectin (fiber) are also contained in ACV.
    ACV is cheap, easy to use and it really benefits our health in numerous ways. ACV can benefit both people and their pets. It is antibacterial and anti-fungal and gives the immune system a good boost. As a high potassium electrolyte balancer, it remineralizes the body and helps normalizethe blood’s alkaline acid balance.ACV is the natural king of skin remedies. It is wonderful for itching and scratching pets as well as a superb skin and hair conditioner. Good old apple cider vinegar either straight or diluted 50/50 with water can be applied directly to the affected area and allowed to dry. It will kill bacteria on hot spots, eliminate dandruff, rejuvenate hair, skin and help sweeten and balance the pH levels in the body. When giving your dpg a bath, shampoo, rinse, then apply ACV either straight or diluted, followed by rinsing with water. Notice, any residue shampoo will be washed out and you will feel and see an increased softness and sheen to the coat.
    Apple cider vinegar is a powerful detoxifying and purifying agent. It breaks down fatty, mucous and phlegm deposits within the body. By breaking down these substances it improves the health and function of the vital organs, such as the kidneys, bladder and liver, by preventing excessively alkaline urine. Put a tablespoon of ACV in your dog’s drinking water every day and you will no longer have those brown spots in your lawn from the dog’s urine.


    This powerful potion also promotes digestion, assimilation and elimination, all the while neutralizing any toxic substances that enter the body. Cider vinegar has been found to ..neutralize any harmful bacteria that may be found in certain foods. While dogs and cats do not have to worry too much about the bacteria in raw meat, if YOU are in doubt, you can pour a little Apple Cider Vinegar over thier raw meal.
    Cider vinegar can also be beneficial for symptoms such as tooth decay and splitting of your dog’s toenails, which can be symptoms of potassium deficiency. Potassium is essential for the replacement of worn-out tissues within the body. This mineral is also important to soft tissue repair, as calcium is to the bones and teeth which makes it a wonderful supplement for senior dogs.
    Tests have proven that when potassium, in the form of cider vinegar is fed to livestock their appearance improves and their stamina increases.
    Cider vinegar is thought to be beneficial in the treatment of arthritis, as a supplement added to your pet’s daily water supply (or poured over the food) or with compresses soaked in hot vinegar applied directly to the joints. It is also thought to be helpful when used to treat allergies, osteoporosis, cancer, candida, high cholesterol, constipation, muscle cramps, colitis, diabetes, diarrhea, depression, dizziness, ear discharge, eczema, fatigue, kidney stones, kidney and bladder problems, metabolism, and stiff joints.
    The supplementation of ACV has been known to naturally remove red tear stains from the inside out. It is also used by many to prevent fleas when used in a rinse for the dog’s coat.
    Recently, Dr. Louis Ducarre of Geneva, Switzerland, author of the fairly new book,Natural Cures, Natural Life states that when mixed with honey, apple cider becomes potent enough to cure cancer, heart disease and other deadly ailments .
    Natural apple cider vinegar is found in health food stores. It should be a rich amber color with the “mother” quite visible as sentiment on the bottom. The strength of vinegar is important. All varieties of vinegar contain about 4 to 7 percent acetic acid, with 5 percent being the most common amount. Acetic acid is what gives vinegar its tart and sour taste.
    There is nothing beneficial about commercial distilled vinegars except for pickling, cleaning and disinfection —they have no health value!
    Bragg, Paul and Linda, N.D., Ph.D., “Apple Cider Vinegar, Miracle Health System”, Published Health Science, Santa Barbara, California
    Jarvis, D.C, M.D., D.C. “Folk Medicine”, and“Arthritis and Folk Medicine”, Published Fawcett Publications, Inc., Greenwich, Connecticut
    Puotinen, C.J., “The Encyclopedia of Natural Pet Care” Published Keats Publishing, Inc., New Canaan, Connecticut


    | Advanced Search





    THE PET HEALTH LIBRARY
    By Wendy C. Brooks, DVM, DipABVP
    Educational Director, VeterinaryPartner.com



    Panosteitis: Growing Pains in Dogs
    (also called enostosis, or pano for short)


    Growing Pains for Dogs?


    We have all heard the term growing pains and when this term is applied to dogs, more often than not it is referring to panosteitis. Growing pains in children involve leg pains of unclear origin that generally resolve when the child enters teen years. Panosteitis in dogs is a specific painful bone condition involving the long leg bones of large breed dogs generally between ages 5 and 18 months. The condition can be quite painful during its flare-ups but ultimately resolves permanently when the pup outgrows it. As in humans with growing pains, the cause of panosteitis is not clear cut. Panosteitis is often referred to as growing pains because of the similarity to the human malady.


    Diagnosis of panosteitis is relatively straight forward. The clinical picture of an adolescent large breed dog with long bone lameness is suggestive of numerous developmental bone diseases, such as hypertrophic osteodystrophy, osteochondrosis dissecans, panosteitis etc. In panosteitis, there is a slight predisposition of males over females. While larger breeds are more commonly affected, any dog could potentially develop this condition. The lameness can shift from one leg to another and can be accompanied by fever. Painful episodes last 1 to 3 weeks typically but recur, often changing legs, until the puppy outgrows the condition.







    In panosteitis, characteristic cloudiness in the bone marrow cavities is visible on radiographs. If there is any doubt about whether these lesions are really there, radiographs can be repeated in a couple of weeks and the lesions will likely be more prominent.


    Treatment is aimed at relieving the pain until the puppy outgrows the problem.


    What Causes Panosteitis?


    What is actually happening inside a bone with panosteitis is complicated. A bone's marrow cavity contains two types of marrow: hemopoietic marrow that produces blood cells and fatty marrow, which is basically just fat. In panosteitis the fatty marrow is replaced with fibrous tissue. The fibrous tissue is then replaced by a type of bone called woven bone. On a radiographic image, woven bone is represented by fluffy opacities.


    The marrow cavity can be nearly obliterated by encroaching woven bone. Eventually, the normal cells involved in bone remodeling finally take over, building new bone where it should be and dissolving bone where it should not be. Ultimately, the bone tissue is re-structured back to normal.


    What causes all this to happen in the first place is unclear and open to speculation. There is some evidence of an infectious cause: a normal dog will develop panosteitis if it receives a bone inoculation of marrow from an affected dog. Furthermore, some dogs develop a fever and high white blood cell count along with their bone issues, indicating an infectious cause. Bacteria have not been cultured from panosteitis lesions but it has been surmised that a virus is involved. Still, despite extensive study, an infectious agent has not been isolated.


    Another theory is that the recent trend in high-protein dog foods is to blame. The idea here is that protein accumulation in the bone marrow leads to swelling inside the bone. Because the bone is a rigid structure and cannot expand, pressure is exerted on the blood vessels leading to tissue death, inflammation and the panosteitis phenomenon. This is still just a theory.


    Since there is a breed predisposition for panosteitis (German shepherd dogs, Golden retrievers, Basset hounds, Doberman pinschers, and Labrador retrievers), this implies a genetic basis. It has often been noted that most of the breeds predisposed to panosteitis are also the breeds predisposed to the genetic blood clotting disorder called Von Willebrand’s Disease. It has been suggested that dogs with panosteitis be screened for Von Willebrand’s Disease as part of their evaluation.


    The cause of panosteitis is still a matter of theory and investigation. No one really knows what causes it.


    Treatment


    As mentioned, the only treatment is pain relief until the dog outgrows the condition. For most dogs this means one of the anti-inflammatory pain relievers such as Rimadyl, Deramaxx, Metacam, or Previcox. If this is inadequate,combinations of adjunctive therapy and pain relievers can be used. The ultimate cure, however, is time.


    Date Published: 4/25/2011 10:13:00 AM









    Copyright 2011 - 2013 by the Veterinary Information Network, Inc. All rights reserved.


    Permanent Link:


    0 Comment(s)
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    I have no experience with it either. Hope your bully is okay

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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    Quote Originally Posted by 2BullyMama View Post
    I have no experience with it, but will tag a few members that might have some insight.
    Thank you Christine.

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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    Quote Originally Posted by Vikinggirl View Post
    Hi, I looked this up for you, and copied and pasted it, from what I read Pano is basically growing pains in dogs, it is common up to 18 months of age, and then they outgrow it, treatment is usually anti inflammatories. You could also try some natural remedies such as massaging and rubbing his legs, maybe some heating pads wrapped in a towel on his legs, and I give my guys a Tbsp of apple cider vinegar in their drinking water everyday, there are a lot of benefits to apple cider vinegar. One of them is it is a natural anti inflammatory, so may help with inflammation in his limbs. It won't hurt as its a natural remedy, also salmon oil is good, and an be added to their kibble, or you can give it in a capsule form. I'll copy and paste the benefits of apple cider vinegar for you as well. Hope this helps.


    Benefits of Apple cider vinegar
    Current Article


    http://www.VeterinaryPartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=3238


    By Singing The Praises Of Apple Cider Vinegar on Jul 6, 2008 in Dr.Jeannie, Dog Health - Immune System, Dog Breeders Corner, Dog Heart Health, Dog Nutrition, Doggone Home & Garden Stuff


    Apple Cider Vinegar


    Apple cider is known around the world as Mother Nature’s miracle medicine, a powerful weapon in the war against aging and disease that is more effective than many high-priced prescription drugs. When God created this fruit He designed it be a food and a medicine!
    Apple cider vinegar (ACV) is golden liquid concentrated with the healthy goodness of apples. It contains more than 30 important nutrients, 12 minerals, over 6 vitamins, essential acids and several enzymes. Moreover, it has a large dose of pectin for a healthy heart, and thus, healthy as a whole.
    Many vitamins, minerals and other nutrients and substances are available in ACV to improve the health of your dog. ACV can provide them with enzymes and important minerals, such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, chlorine,
    phosphorus, iron, silicon and other trace minerals. The vitamins contained in ACV are bioflavonoids (vitamin P), beta-carotene (precursor to vitamin A), vitamin C, E, B1, B2, and B6. Tannins from the crushed cell walls of fresh apples as well as malic acid, tartaric acid, propionic acid, acetic acid and pectin (fiber) are also contained in ACV.
    ACV is cheap, easy to use and it really benefits our health in numerous ways. ACV can benefit both people and their pets. It is antibacterial and anti-fungal and gives the immune system a good boost. As a high potassium electrolyte balancer, it remineralizes the body and helps normalizethe blood’s alkaline acid balance.ACV is the natural king of skin remedies. It is wonderful for itching and scratching pets as well as a superb skin and hair conditioner. Good old apple cider vinegar either straight or diluted 50/50 with water can be applied directly to the affected area and allowed to dry. It will kill bacteria on hot spots, eliminate dandruff, rejuvenate hair, skin and help sweeten and balance the pH levels in the body. When giving your dpg a bath, shampoo, rinse, then apply ACV either straight or diluted, followed by rinsing with water. Notice, any residue shampoo will be washed out and you will feel and see an increased softness and sheen to the coat.
    Apple cider vinegar is a powerful detoxifying and purifying agent. It breaks down fatty, mucous and phlegm deposits within the body. By breaking down these substances it improves the health and function of the vital organs, such as the kidneys, bladder and liver, by preventing excessively alkaline urine. Put a tablespoon of ACV in your dog’s drinking water every day and you will no longer have those brown spots in your lawn from the dog’s urine.


    This powerful potion also promotes digestion, assimilation and elimination, all the while neutralizing any toxic substances that enter the body. Cider vinegar has been found to ..neutralize any harmful bacteria that may be found in certain foods. While dogs and cats do not have to worry too much about the bacteria in raw meat, if YOU are in doubt, you can pour a little Apple Cider Vinegar over thier raw meal.
    Cider vinegar can also be beneficial for symptoms such as tooth decay and splitting of your dog’s toenails, which can be symptoms of potassium deficiency. Potassium is essential for the replacement of worn-out tissues within the body. This mineral is also important to soft tissue repair, as calcium is to the bones and teeth which makes it a wonderful supplement for senior dogs.
    Tests have proven that when potassium, in the form of cider vinegar is fed to livestock their appearance improves and their stamina increases.
    Cider vinegar is thought to be beneficial in the treatment of arthritis, as a supplement added to your pet’s daily water supply (or poured over the food) or with compresses soaked in hot vinegar applied directly to the joints. It is also thought to be helpful when used to treat allergies, osteoporosis, cancer, candida, high cholesterol, constipation, muscle cramps, colitis, diabetes, diarrhea, depression, dizziness, ear discharge, eczema, fatigue, kidney stones, kidney and bladder problems, metabolism, and stiff joints.
    The supplementation of ACV has been known to naturally remove red tear stains from the inside out. It is also used by many to prevent fleas when used in a rinse for the dog’s coat.
    Recently, Dr. Louis Ducarre of Geneva, Switzerland, author of the fairly new book,Natural Cures, Natural Life states that when mixed with honey, apple cider becomes potent enough to cure cancer, heart disease and other deadly ailments .
    Natural apple cider vinegar is found in health food stores. It should be a rich amber color with the “mother” quite visible as sentiment on the bottom. The strength of vinegar is important. All varieties of vinegar contain about 4 to 7 percent acetic acid, with 5 percent being the most common amount. Acetic acid is what gives vinegar its tart and sour taste.
    There is nothing beneficial about commercial distilled vinegars except for pickling, cleaning and disinfection —they have no health value!
    Bragg, Paul and Linda, N.D., Ph.D., “Apple Cider Vinegar, Miracle Health System”, Published Health Science, Santa Barbara, California
    Jarvis, D.C, M.D., D.C. “Folk Medicine”, and“Arthritis and Folk Medicine”, Published Fawcett Publications, Inc., Greenwich, Connecticut
    Puotinen, C.J., “The Encyclopedia of Natural Pet Care” Published Keats Publishing, Inc., New Canaan, Connecticut


    | Advanced Search





    THE PET HEALTH LIBRARY
    By Wendy C. Brooks, DVM, DipABVP
    Educational Director, VeterinaryPartner.com



    Panosteitis: Growing Pains in Dogs
    (also called enostosis, or pano for short)


    Growing Pains for Dogs?


    We have all heard the term growing pains and when this term is applied to dogs, more often than not it is referring to panosteitis. Growing pains in children involve leg pains of unclear origin that generally resolve when the child enters teen years. Panosteitis in dogs is a specific painful bone condition involving the long leg bones of large breed dogs generally between ages 5 and 18 months. The condition can be quite painful during its flare-ups but ultimately resolves permanently when the pup outgrows it. As in humans with growing pains, the cause of panosteitis is not clear cut. Panosteitis is often referred to as growing pains because of the similarity to the human malady.


    Diagnosis of panosteitis is relatively straight forward. The clinical picture of an adolescent large breed dog with long bone lameness is suggestive of numerous developmental bone diseases, such as hypertrophic osteodystrophy, osteochondrosis dissecans, panosteitis etc. In panosteitis, there is a slight predisposition of males over females. While larger breeds are more commonly affected, any dog could potentially develop this condition. The lameness can shift from one leg to another and can be accompanied by fever. Painful episodes last 1 to 3 weeks typically but recur, often changing legs, until the puppy outgrows the condition.







    In panosteitis, characteristic cloudiness in the bone marrow cavities is visible on radiographs. If there is any doubt about whether these lesions are really there, radiographs can be repeated in a couple of weeks and the lesions will likely be more prominent.


    Treatment is aimed at relieving the pain until the puppy outgrows the problem.


    What Causes Panosteitis?


    What is actually happening inside a bone with panosteitis is complicated. A bone's marrow cavity contains two types of marrow: hemopoietic marrow that produces blood cells and fatty marrow, which is basically just fat. In panosteitis the fatty marrow is replaced with fibrous tissue. The fibrous tissue is then replaced by a type of bone called woven bone. On a radiographic image, woven bone is represented by fluffy opacities.


    The marrow cavity can be nearly obliterated by encroaching woven bone. Eventually, the normal cells involved in bone remodeling finally take over, building new bone where it should be and dissolving bone where it should not be. Ultimately, the bone tissue is re-structured back to normal.


    What causes all this to happen in the first place is unclear and open to speculation. There is some evidence of an infectious cause: a normal dog will develop panosteitis if it receives a bone inoculation of marrow from an affected dog. Furthermore, some dogs develop a fever and high white blood cell count along with their bone issues, indicating an infectious cause. Bacteria have not been cultured from panosteitis lesions but it has been surmised that a virus is involved. Still, despite extensive study, an infectious agent has not been isolated.


    Another theory is that the recent trend in high-protein dog foods is to blame. The idea here is that protein accumulation in the bone marrow leads to swelling inside the bone. Because the bone is a rigid structure and cannot expand, pressure is exerted on the blood vessels leading to tissue death, inflammation and the panosteitis phenomenon. This is still just a theory.


    Since there is a breed predisposition for panosteitis (German shepherd dogs, Golden retrievers, Basset hounds, Doberman pinschers, and Labrador retrievers), this implies a genetic basis. It has often been noted that most of the breeds predisposed to panosteitis are also the breeds predisposed to the genetic blood clotting disorder called Von Willebrand’s Disease. It has been suggested that dogs with panosteitis be screened for Von Willebrand’s Disease as part of their evaluation.


    The cause of panosteitis is still a matter of theory and investigation. No one really knows what causes it.


    Treatment


    As mentioned, the only treatment is pain relief until the dog outgrows the condition. For most dogs this means one of the anti-inflammatory pain relievers such as Rimadyl, Deramaxx, Metacam, or Previcox. If this is inadequate,combinations of adjunctive therapy and pain relievers can be used. The ultimate cure, however, is time.


    Date Published: 4/25/2011 10:13:00 AM









    Copyright 2011 - 2013 by the Veterinary Information Network, Inc. All rights reserved.


    Permanent Link:


    0 Comment(s)

    Thank you Monica for going to so much trouble and providing so much detailed information, I will print this and take it to the vet with me tomorrow.

    Best regards,
    Mark.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    thank you to everyone for your concern and replies.

    Best Regards,
    Mark.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    Quote Originally Posted by Fergie2012 View Post
    Thank you Monica for going to so much trouble and providing so much detailed information, I will print this and take it to the vet with me tomorrow.

    Best regards,
    Mark.
    You're very welcome, and I hope your baby outgrows his growing pains soon.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: "Pano" advice needed

    Hi,
    I wanted to update on Fergie's leg condition, I had the x-rays done and, according to the vet, his front left leg looks like it is showing a touch of arthritis. The vet seems to think he has just grown too fast and its not a big deal and the limping will stop.

    He has given us a liquid pain killer which we are to give Fergie for 5 days, as well as this I already give him 2000mg of glucosamine a day, along with vitamin C and extract of green lipid mussel. I am also giving him the apple cider vinegar in his water thanks to the tip from Monica.

    Any other advice or information on how to treat/manage arthritis would be greatly appreciated, as I said, the vet doesn't see it as a big deal but he is not a bulldog specialist so I would value any opinion and advice from the professionals on here.

    Best Regards,
    Mark.

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