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Thread: Umbilical Hernia

  1. #1
    Pooper scooper
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    Chuncho
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    Default Umbilical Hernia

    Hey everyone just a question my girl Chuncho is 8 months and has had an umbilical hernia since we got her. The vet told us to massage it and it might go down but it has stayed the same. I was wondering when is the best time to get it removed? I don't want to get her spayed so should I get it done now? She hasn't got any other health problems.thanks for your help

  2. #2
    Wrinkle Wiper adamslater's Avatar
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    Adam & Jen
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    Winston
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    Default Re: Umbilical Hernia

    My pup Winston is 11 months now and we will be getting his umbilical hernia repaired when he is fixed at 12 months. We used to massage his hernia too...and it came to a point where it wasn't making a difference and it wasn't going in anymore so we stopped.
    It depends how big the hernia is, a vet would be able to tell you if it needs to be done right away or if you can wait. Winston's is small so we were able to wait without it causing any issues.
    Best of luck!

  3. #3
    "Slug Assassin" and PBS Gardening Dweeb Vicaroo1000's Avatar
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    Default Re: Umbilical Hernia

    Why don't you want to get her spayed? Bea had an umbilical hernia too and it was repaired while she was already under anesthesia for her spay. Even if I had known that she was going to be allergic to the sutures (another nightmare), I would have spayed her.

    Why?
    My spayed female pet will live a longer, healthier life. Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer, which is fatal in about 50 percent of dogs and 90 percent of cats. Spaying your pet before her first heat offers the best protection from these diseases.
    My spayed female won't go into heat and won't have to endure the frustration of wanting to breed.
    Spaying or neutering will NOT make my pet fat. Lack of exercise and overfeeding will cause your pet to pack on the extra pounds-not neutering. Your pet will remain fit and trim as long as you continue to provide exercise and monitor food intake.
    The cost of my pet's spay/neuter surgery is a lot less than the cost of having and caring for a litter since most EBs are born via Cesarian section.

  4. #4
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    Karen
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    Default

    I know these things can disappear on their own as the puppy grows. But sometimes not!

    How long is it since the vet saw her?

  5. #5
    Pooper scooper
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    Chuncho
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    Default Re: Umbilical Hernia

    Quote Originally Posted by kazzy220 View Post
    I know these things can disappear on their own as the puppy grows. But sometimes not!

    How long is it since the vet saw her?

    Her last visit was when she had her last vaccination so was a while ago. Maybe il just book an appointment just to make sure and see what he sais

  6. #6
    Pooper scooper
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    Default Re: Umbilical Hernia

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicaroo1000 View Post
    Why don't you want to get her spayed? Bea had an umbilical hernia too and it was repaired while she was already under anesthesia for her spay. Even if I had known that she was going to be allergic to the sutures (another nightmare), I would have spayed her.

    Why?
    My spayed female pet will live a longer, healthier life. Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer, which is fatal in about 50 percent of dogs and 90 percent of cats. Spaying your pet before her first heat offers the best protection from these diseases.
    My spayed female won't go into heat and won't have to endure the frustration of wanting to breed.
    Spaying or neutering will NOT make my pet fat. Lack of exercise and overfeeding will cause your pet to pack on the extra pounds-not neutering. Your pet will remain fit and trim as long as you continue to provide exercise and monitor food intake.
    The cost of my pet's spay/neuter surgery is a lot less than the cost of having and caring for a litter since most EBs are born via Cesarian section.

    I don't want to get her spayed as later on down the track I may want her to have one litter of puppies. I've had female dogs my whole life so I know what to expect. Thanks for the information though

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