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Thread: Sores in between Lola's toes

  1. #13
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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    I have found from listening to others' stories and from personal experience that they can be caused by an allergy. Often, it is a food allergy. You may want to consider a change in food if they are re-occuring. A change in protein can be a good start. I used peroxide but I think, if I had known, I would have done epsom salt as well.

    For yeast, you can do a 50/50 mix of apple cider vinegar and clean the area. That can often help as the acv kills the yeast. However, the yeast is a symptom, again, usually of an allergy.

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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    I dont think it is a food allergy because we have changed her food twice since she started getting them. Epsom salt, would that be the same concept as salt water? Thats what i have been using. I hate for her to suffer, and those things really seem to bug her.

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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    Quote Originally Posted by harleyshay1 View Post
    I dont think it is a food allergy because we have changed her food twice since she started getting them. Epsom salt, would that be the same concept as salt water? Thats what i have been using. I hate for her to suffer, and those things really seem to bug her.
    When you have changed the food, do they both have the same meat ingredient (example, chicken)? Also, what foods have you tried? How about treats? What kind are you giving her? Does she spend a lot of time out in the grass?

    Just throwing some things out there. You really have to be a detective lol. Poor girl

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    Newbie harleyshay1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    I have tried chicken and lamb both. She used to eat the Rachel Ray food but we changed to Iams and before the Rachel Ray we bought her beneful. She doesnt get treats excessively, but usually its just milkbones and an extra treat every once in a while. She does get table food though, but she got that before she started getting these. Shes a completely indoor dog except to go outside to potty. I mean i guess if they are common then i should just keep them clean so they will go away quickly.

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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    They are common but you can find the source if you do enough leg work . Personally, I would consider the food....maybe look at one that is grain free. Chicken and grains seem to be the worst culprits of this sort of thing. Chicken was our issue. At least chicken in kibble anyway. I am sure you will get more advice later. If you think you would like to investigate further, there are articles (click on articles at the top) about food and nutrition for bulldogs.

    You are doing right by using the salt water. That seems to do the trick. Good luck and I hope she feels better soon!

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    Newbie harleyshay1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    Thanks! The salt water seems to take the redness away and start working immediately. Ill look into a different food as well. thanks for your help.

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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    Quote Originally Posted by harleyshay1 View Post
    Thanks! The salt water seems to take the redness away and start working immediately. Ill look into a different food as well. thanks for your help.
    You are VERY welcome . You may also want to wipe paws after going out. It is major allergy season and it could be something environmental. So hard to tell! You are doing a great job! Give her big hugs

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    Kennel Cleaner kayrahbear's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    I was just coming here to ask this very same question. Roscoe has them between nearly every toe right now. I'm glad the salt soaks are helping. I'm going to give that a shot for Roscoe until he goes for his allergy test next week.

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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    Someone asked: [replacer_img]

    Magnesium sulfate
    (or magnesium sulphate) is a chemical compound containing magnesium, sulfur and oxygen, with the formula MgSO4. It is often encountered as the heptahydrate epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O), commonly called Epsom salt

    Salt, also known as table salt, or [replacer_a], is a rock salt that is composed primarily of mineral (sodium chloride), a chemical compound belonging to the larger class of NaCl.

  10. #22
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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    My Truman also has this problem. My vet has tried a variety of things, but it keeps coming back. Recently, I found the below article on another site. I haven't tried Epsom salt, but will definitely give it a whirl. Truman's currently on a course of antibiotics... I'm hoping it will give him some relief.


    "These are often called "interdigital cysts", though a correct term would be furuncles. They are actually caused by ingrown hairs. I usually prescribe six weeks of antibiotics for these. I was taught Ciprofloxacin as treatment of choice b/c of its ability to penetrate the areas. Here's the write up on them from the Merck Veterinary Manual: http://www.merckvetmanual.​com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=ht​m%2Fbc%2F70800.htm"

    Interdigital Furunculosis: Introduction
    Etiology
    Clinical Findings and Lesions
    Diagnosis
    Treatment

    Interdigital furunculosis, dog

    Interdigital furuncles, often incorrectly referred to as interdigital cysts, are painful nodular lesions located in the interdigital webs of dogs. Histologically, these lesions represent areas of nodular pyogranulomatous inflammation—they are almost never cystic.
    Etiology:
    The most common cause is a deep bacterial infection. Many dog breeds (eg, Shar-Pei, Labrador Retriever, English Bulldog) are predisposed to bacterial interdigital furunculosis because of the short bristly hairs located on the webbing between the toes, prominent interdigital webbing, or both. The short shafts of hairs are easily forced backward into the hair follicles during locomotion (traumatic implantation). Hair, ie, keratin, is very inflammatory in the skin, and secondary bacterial infections are common. Less commonly, foreign material is traumatically embedded in the skin. Demodicosis ( Mange in Sheep and Goats) may be a primary cause of interdigital furunculosis. Canine atopy ( Allergic Inhalant Dermatitis: Introduction) is also a common cause of recurrent interdigital furunculosis.

    Clinical Findings and Lesions:
    Early lesions of interdigital furunculosis may appear as focal or generalized areas of erythema and papules in the webbing of the feet that, if left untreated, rapidly develop into single or multiple nodules. The latter usually are 1-2 cm in diameter, reddish purple, shiny, and fluctuant; they may rupture when palpated and exude a bloody material. Interdigital furuncles are most commonly found on the dorsal aspect of the paw, but may also be found ventrally. Furuncles are usually painful, and the dog may be obviously lame on the affected foot (or feet) and lick and bite at the lesions. Lesions caused by a foreign body, eg, a grass awn, are usually solitary and often occur on a front foot; recurrence is not common in these cases. If bacteria cause the interdigital furunculosis, there may be several nodules with new lesions developing as others resolve. A common cause of recurrence is the granulomatous reaction to the presence of free keratin in the tissues.

    Diagnosis:
    This is often based on clinical signs alone. The major differential diagnoses are traumatic lesions and neoplasia, although the latter is rare. The most useful diagnostic tests include skin scrapings for Demodex mites, impression smears, or fine-needle aspirates to confirm the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate. Unusual or recurrent lesions should be excised for histopathologic examination. Solitary lesions may require surgical exploration to find and remove foreign bodies such as grass awns.

    Treatment:
    Interdigital furuncles respond best to a combination of topical and systemic therapy. Cephalexin (20 mg/kg, PO, tid, or 30 mg/kg, PO, bid) is recommended for 4-6 wk of initial therapy. However, because the lesions are pyogranulomatous, it may be difficult for antibiotics to penetrate them; therefore, >8 wk of systemic antibiotic therapy may be required for lesions to completely resolve. These lesions are often complicated by concurrent Malassezia spp infections. Oral ketoconazole or itraconazole (5-10 mg/kg) for 30 days may be indicated. The presence of Malassezia can be documented by cytologic examination of nail bed debris and/or impression smears of the skin. Topical foot soaks in warm water with or without an antibiotic solution (eg, chlorhexidine) and the application of mupiricin ointment are recommended. Some dogs may benefit from antibiotic wraps and bandaging. Antihistamines given for the first several weeks of treatment may partially alleviate pruritus, if present. Glucocorticoids are contraindicated.
    Chronic, recurrent interdigital furunculosis is most often caused by inappropriate antibiotic therapy (too short, wrong dose/dosage, wrong drug), concurrent corticosteroid administration, demodicosis, an anatomic predisposition, or a foreign body reaction to keratin. Lesions that recur in spite of therapy can also be a sign of an underlying disease, eg, atopy, hypothyroidism, or concurrent Malassezia infection. Lesions in confined dogs are likely to recur unless the dog is removed from wire or concrete surfaces. In some chronic cases, surgical excision or surgical correction of the webbing via fusion podoplasty may be needed. Alternatively, pulse antibiotic therapy (full dosage therapy 2-3 times/wk) or chronic low dosage antibiotic therapy (eg, 500 mg/dog, PO, sid) may help maintain clinical remission and provide pain relief in dogs with chronic lesions. This therapy is recommended only when the inciting cause cannot be identified (eg, idiopathic pyoderma), treated (eg, anatomic predisposition), or resolved (eg, chronic infection caused by foreign body material or keratin).

  11. #23
    Bulldog Vet in Training karenben's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    they can be caused by an ingrowing hair ,when plucked out the cysts go,karen

  12. #24
    Dog Park Attendant Become a 4 Paw Member Maximus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sores in between Lola's toes

    A deep bacterial infection is the cause of Interdigital cysts, not a Food allergy. The treatment requires an 8-week course of Antibiotic therapy - anything less is useless and ineffective.
    Topical foot soaks with Chlorhexidine are recommended. I'm sure the epsom salts could be effectiver as well. My concern is that we keep confirming the cause of everything as being from FOOD ALLERGIES. There really are specific behaviors a dog will exhibit if indeed there is a Food Allergy, and one of them is non-stop Paw licking. Without that, it is highly unlikely that the cause of
    anything is from a Food allergy.

    I've had Maximus back and forth to the Vet and specialists way to many times with skin problems, wrinkle problems, interdigital cyst problems, and none of the 3 Vets ever indicated it was a
    result of his Food.

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