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Thread: Moving on to a training collar.

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    The Ultimate Sourmug helsonwheels's Avatar
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    Default Re: Moving on to a training collar.

    Before investing into all sorts which might not even be necessary, I would go see a good reputated trainer. Do be afraid to investigate into the trainer, ask questions from people that went to this trainer. Trainers sees all sorts it's their job and very often will correct the problem without any gizmos. He/she will tell you to bring in your other dog to correct your EB on the spot and all. All these "gimzo", time, being on the issue 24/7, plus you have little ones to take care of can be overwhelming. Good proper "Gizmos" adds up and at the end can amount to the same price as a trainer. Just a thought

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    Default Re: Moving on to a training collar.

    Our fights were always in the house and sometimes we never did know what started it as you cannot watch them every second. They also got on fine for a few months at a time, then boom, it would start all over again.

    One of the worst fights (and last I might add) happened in one of their crates! The AB was in hers and for some reason our Grey went in there with her. My husband was by himself (I was at home in the UK at the time) and he had a hell of a time trying to break it up. He had a couple of bites but nothing serious thank goodness. After another trip to the vet and us talking it over, he called the Greyhound rescue where we got her and she was rehomed immediately. I did get to see her a couple of times after and we kept in touch with her new owners and still are actually. Dog fights are horrible things, really distressing for all concerned.
    Chumly 2002-2014 A gentle soul and the love of my life.

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    Default Re: Moving on to a training collar.

    Ok, I also agree that a trainer is needed. I have two bulldogs. One is very submissive, Frankie and the other is not so submissive, Brutus. Before you go to a muzzle, which really I think isn't solving you problem at all or a collar, I think a trainer is necessary first because not only will they help your with the dogs behavior, they will teach you how to read your dogs body language before the conflicts happen. I am telling you this from experience. I will give you some examples.

    When I know we are getting company over, I make sure Brutus is outside and Frankie is inside. Frankie is allowed to greet the visitor first and then Brutus is allowed in to greet the visitor. The number one trigger to aggression is chaos and a visitor with a lot of activity and fan fare will surely create chaos and aggression. Always try to keep the environment subdued. Also, I can see it in Brutus' face and body language when he is feeling like he wants to pounce on Frankie. We are at a point where when I see him tensing up, I can say, "Brutus, behave yourself or you will go in your kennel" and do not be afraid to put the aggressor into a time out. It really does help. Most times he can be redirected out of his snit. BUT like @2BullyMama, Christine said it is KEY to address the behavior BEFORE it happens. This is where the trainer will teach you what to look for. I truly believe that a lot of aggression can be avoided by simply changing behaviors and habits and knowing your dog.
    My smooshy face boy!

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    Pet Sitter Biscuitsmom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Moving on to a training collar.

    Quote Originally Posted by helsonwheels View Post
    Before investing into all sorts which might not even be necessary, I would go see a good reputated trainer. Do be afraid to investigate into the trainer, ask questions from people that went to this trainer. Trainers sees all sorts it's their job and very often will correct the problem without any gizmos. He/she will tell you to bring in your other dog to correct your EB on the spot and all. All these "gimzo", time, being on the issue 24/7, plus you have little ones to take care of can be overwhelming. Good proper "Gizmos" adds up and at the end can amount to the same price as a trainer. Just a thought
    Very good point! I'm looking around now and just need to discuss further with my husband who has been working long hours. Maybe we just need a few sessions so I can see what to do to be more assertive and correct her. I just want my pets to be happy and be sure my kids are safe : )

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  9. #17
    Pet Sitter Biscuitsmom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Moving on to a training collar.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Chumly View Post
    Our fights were always in the house and sometimes we never did know what started it as you cannot watch them every second. They also got on fine for a few months at a time, then boom, it would start all over again.

    One of the worst fights (and last I might add) happened in one of their crates! The AB was in hers and for some reason our Grey went in there with her. My husband was by himself (I was at home in the UK at the time) and he had a hell of a time trying to break it up. He had a couple of bites but nothing serious thank goodness. After another trip to the vet and us talking it over, he called the Greyhound rescue where we got her and she was rehomed immediately. I did get to see her a couple of times after and we kept in touch with her new owners and still are actually. Dog fights are horrible things, really distressing for all concerned.
    Oh no that's horrible! Yes they are very distressing indeed. I have wanted an EB my entire life and waited to the perfect moment to get one but didn't really think something like this would happen. I really don't think she is "dog aggressive" just reactive and in a very annoying puppy stage. Reminds me of a little sibling that just keeps poking the older one until the older one just gives. (I can relate lol). I'm hoping with training and some maturity she will grow out of it.

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  11. #18
    The Ultimate Sourmug helsonwheels's Avatar
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    Default Re: Moving on to a training collar.

    Quote Originally Posted by Biscuitsmom View Post
    Very good point! I'm looking around now and just need to discuss further with my husband who has been working long hours. Maybe we just need a few sessions so I can see what to do to be more assertive and correct her. I just want my pets to be happy and be sure my kids are safe : )
    First most important thing is your children's safety! I was in the middle of my GS attack and I swear a 10 second attack felt like 10 mins. I got bitten by the other dog as my GS knew it was my hand so he wasn't biting me but did in ten seconds ripped the other dog badly. I had to go to the hospital for shots cause of the other dog's bite. That's why you don't want your children in the middle of any dog fight. Glad you're looking for a trainer and not "gizmos" for time being. Good job!

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    Pet Sitter Biscuitsmom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Moving on to a training collar.

    Quote Originally Posted by brutus77 View Post
    Ok, I also agree that a trainer is needed. I have two bulldogs. One is very submissive, Frankie and the other is not so submissive, Brutus. Before you go to a muzzle, which really I think isn't solving you problem at all or a collar, I think a trainer is necessary first because not only will they help your with the dogs behavior, they will teach you how to read your dogs body language before the conflicts happen. I am telling you this from experience. I will give you some examples.

    When I know we are getting company over, I make sure Brutus is outside and Frankie is inside. Frankie is allowed to greet the visitor first and then Brutus is allowed in to greet the visitor. The number one trigger to aggression is chaos and a visitor with a lot of activity and fan fare will surely create chaos and aggression. Always try to keep the environment subdued. Also, I can see it in Brutus' face and body language when he is feeling like he wants to pounce on Frankie. We are at a point where when I see him tensing up, I can say, "Brutus, behave yourself or you will go in your kennel" and do not be afraid to put the aggressor into a time out. It really does help. Most times he can be redirected out of his snit. BUT like @2BullyMama, Christine said it is KEY to address the behavior BEFORE it happens. This is where the trainer will teach you what to look for. I truly believe that a lot of aggression can be avoided by simply changing behaviors and habits and knowing your dog.
    Yes great advice, thank you! I thought I was getting pretty good at picking up the signals but if I'm not looking for a second that seems to be when it happens such as the other day. My girls were throwing snacks on the floor and that sparked the fight. I'm much more aware now.

    I agree too with the visitor thing as well, the first time they fought was when my mom was there and it was over a wooden block of all things! Company does make it worse so I will be paying attention to that. When Biscuit is home inside by herself she is a model dog, just lays by my feet and listens. I do think training can fix this.

  14. #20
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    Default Re: Moving on to a training collar.

    We hired a dog trainer for a very similar issue (among others) and I'll share with you advice that has helped our dogs SO much!

    All toys and bones go in a toy box that has a lid. Dogs cannot get their toys out without us handing it to them. In our living room, dog beds now have a wire lead drilled into the wall stud where we can attach their collar so they have to stay in their spot. When we are all sitting down at night watching TV, dogs go to their spots, get clipped to their wore leads and happily get handed their bones, chew toys etc. The ONLY time these resources come out, are when they are in separate corners in their spots. We have no more scuffles with our mama dog and our 1 year old since doing this. Our evenings are much more relaxed now


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