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Thread: K-9 Military School?

  1. #13
    Bulldog Vet in Training anatess's Avatar
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    Default Re: K-9 Military School?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rural mystic View Post
    I didn't notice the "eliminate hormones" part and I'm not for that unless necessary, does it work? Probably yes in some cases but from what I have read and depending on what you are after then it depends. I'm not going to have Ace neutered unless its absolutely necessary and it may pan out that I may but I am going to let it go until then. I plan on taking Ace to obedient classes as soon as he is off the meds for the respiratory infection and the place where I plan on taking him doesn't usually take dogs until they are 6 months of age anyway and he is not far from that so I may wait a couple of weeks to start. But the place I'm taking Ace has good reviews and have been training military type dogs, police dogs and guard dogs for many years and although Ace is a household pet I still want a dog that will obey the fundamental commands. In my opinion is best for the dog as well as the owner. All things are subject to change but as of now I am going to enroll him
    None of my male dogs ever since I got married (the ones we have and the ones that have since passed) are neutered. None of them have behavior issues that are not corrected by training. Not a single one. Not even the aggressive dogs. And that's even with all of them never setting foot in a school/class and neither me nor my husband ever having gone to "Train the trainer" classes. Will a dog be more manageable after alteration? Some are, some aren't. Either way, it all comes down to training.
    Last edited by anatess; 03-26-2013 at 10:49 PM.

    I got Bullied and loving it!
    Bella "Bullie" Rose, adopted on July 24, 2011

  2. #14
    Bulldog Vet in Training anatess's Avatar
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    Default Re: K-9 Military School?

    Quote Originally Posted by Twice View Post
    This was sent to me to help with training Athena (our Great Dane). The suggestion was that it might help Otis too, especially since the 2 of them are joined at the hip. Well... more like hip to elbow but you get my point


    The thought process behind it has something to do with their size and the importance of discipline. When Thena stands on 2 legs she is taller than I am, an animal like that needs to know her place in the pecking order. Otis is beginning to pick up her habits no matter how difficult they may be for him. Where Athena can just look down on the kitchen counter to take what she wants, Otis has to stand on his hind legs to get there but he gets there now and he never used to before. He's never taken food from the table before, now I need a chicken wire fence to keep him off of it.



    In all honesty, I didn't pay attention to the length of the walk. I read it as if the walk itself that is the training tool isn't it? With all the metal in my back, I couldn't walk a mile if there was a pot of gold at the end of it. Once around the block has me reaching for my dilaudid
    In my opinion, training a 150lb Great Dane is the same as training a 15lb Bichon Frise. Regardless of their size, they still need to know their place in the pack. The length of time and the number of repetitions to achieve the desired result may vary depending on the temperament of the dog. Interestingly, it is easier to train a Great Dane than a Bichon. Of course, some failures in training a Great Dane has a lot bigger impact than the same failure in training a Bichon. A lot of times, Bichon parents let their Bichons get away with misbehavior because... they're small and cute. I don't necessarily agree with this, although yes, my Bichon does things that my English Bulldogs are not allowed to do and that is really all my fault. For example, I'm not as diligent with the Bichon when he jumps on people because... he only gets around the knees whereas a jumping English Bulldog would knock you over. But yes, this is something my husband doesn't like and he could correct it if it happens when he's around. He trains all our dogs - whatever breed it may be - the exact same way, some with more emphasis on natural tendencies. E.g., our English Bulldogs have a strong food/toy resource guarding tendency whereas our Bichon doesn't so he spends more time correcting that. Also, the English Bulldogs are more independent than the Dobermans so he spends more time trying out different motivators with the Bulldogs. In the end, they all learn the same things.

    About that walk... the objective is not the walk. The objective is to expend a dog's excess energy whether it be a walk, a game of fetch, hunting sport, tracking, herding, agility training, etc. etc. This is the same for cats too. A bored dog/cat can be destructive as they try to find things to do on their own. Some dogs - like most adult English Bulldogs - gets wiped out with 10 minutes of fetch play. Some dogs - like a German Shorthaired Pointer - run (not walk) for 20 miles before getting wiped out. So, part of dog ownership is to be able to give the dog an activity to drain that energy balanced with it's bone/muscle/lung capacity. Angus, my English Bulldog, is so motivated that if I don't quit throwing the ball, he will not stop playing fetch until he passes out from exhaustion. Young Great Danes have to balance their exercise with their bone development, so instead of giving a young Great Dane one long walk, they do better with multiple short walks. That kind of thing.
    Last edited by anatess; 03-26-2013 at 11:35 PM.

    I got Bullied and loving it!
    Bella "Bullie" Rose, adopted on July 24, 2011

  3. #15
    Bulldog Vet in Training anatess's Avatar
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    Default Re: K-9 Military School?

    Okay, I don't know what kind of problems you are having with the Dane. But just as a general behavioral issue, not a "my dog just took a bite of my neck thing" or a "my dog has to be elitely trained as he is going to be a K-9 cop or Service Dog thing", here is my opinion on the training thing above.

    1.) If the objective is bonding, the umbilical cord may not be necessary. Umbilical cord can be beneficial for potty training. For bonding, the dog just naturally follows the person around if the person establishes her place in the pack. The umbilical cord doesn't necessarily work to establish your place in the pack. "I control the food" is a better tool.

    2.) Not necessary unless you're correcting aggression and then it's only needed when the aggression occurs.

    3.) Good one. I wouldn't bother withholding touch. Touch is good.

    4.) Good one. The objective is to establish the fact that you are the food source. You are the provider. The method made it too complicated though. Basically, all you need to do is teach the dog to wait until you give him permission to start eating. And when he quits eating, the food is removed and he gets to wait until you give him permission again (next meal). You can feed him in the middle of the kitchen, it doesn't matter. If you have multiple dogs, you can start training individually by separating the dogs at meal times and then working towards putting them together to eat only what's in their bowls only when their name is called. Treats are not free. Treats are for rewarding work.

    5.) Good one.

    6.) This goes with #3. Good one.

    7.) No difference with #6 really.

    8.) Never did this. Soothing to a dog is Safety with his Pack. Don't know what special song does.

    9.) Good one but extreme. The objective is "You're the Boss". He can sleep in your bed, sit on the couch, doesn't matter, as long as he knows you can kick him out anytime you want to. If he growls at you when you kick him out of the couch, you need to tighten the training. If he rushes out of the door ahead of you and you didn't give him permission, you need to tighten the training. If he walks ahead of you so that he's pulling on the leash, you need to tighten the training. But if he's just walking ahead of you because the road is narrow and you want to be able to see him at all times, that's fine, as long as he's not dragging you.

    10.) I talked about this on my post above.

    11.) Not necessary. But, yes, you don't pet the dog if he's whining/barking/begging for one.

    12.) Good one. I do play tug-of-war with the dog when I want to play tug-of-war. But, this is only after he has learned to let go of the toy when I tell him to... so, basically, we can be in the middle of a tug-of-war and if I say drop it, the dog has to drop the toy.

    13.) I addressed this several posts above too.

    Okay, hope this helps. Remember - neither me nor my husband are professional trainers. And none of our dogs have been to any kind of professional class/training. But I have several videos on EBN showing how our dogs respond to our kind of training.
    Last edited by anatess; 03-27-2013 at 12:06 AM.

    I got Bullied and loving it!
    Bella "Bullie" Rose, adopted on July 24, 2011

  4. #16
    "Slug Assassin" and PBS Gardening Dweeb Vicaroo1000's Avatar
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    Default Re: K-9 Military School?

    Honestly, the original post with all the rules sounds like a more militant version of "Nothing In Life is Free".

  5. #17
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    Default Re: K-9 Military School?

    I think that's all a bit much. Dogs need structure, but not necessarily that kind of "discipline". Some of the citations are more about "dog mythology" than "dog psychology" (for instance, all that old-fashioned "dominance" stuff). Some of this advice is probably going to get some people and their dogs in trouble.

    The think to remember is that every dog is an individual, and trying to work things from "tip sheets" can be troublesome. There are lots of good books out there with great advice about how to go about training effectively. One of my favorites is "The Power of Positive Dog Training" by Pat Miller.

  6. #18
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    Default Re: K-9 Military School?

    Quote Originally Posted by BarbaraDavis View Post
    I think that's all a bit much. Dogs need structure, but not necessarily that kind of "discipline". Some of the citations are more about "dog mythology" than "dog psychology" (for instance, all that old-fashioned "dominance" stuff). Some of this advice is probably going to get some people and their dogs in trouble.

    The think to remember is that every dog is an individual, and trying to work things from "tip sheets" can be troublesome. There are lots of good books out there with great advice about how to go about training effectively. One of my favorites is "The Power of Positive Dog Training" by Pat Miller.

    Thanks! I'll check that book out.

    For me, her name was Abby
    10/24/2011 - 11/23/1012


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  7. #19
    Doggie Boutique Owner christyjulene's Avatar
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    Default Re: K-9 Military School?

    I want to snuggle and cuddle my dogs and not make them do push ups for attention. Not the relationship I want with any dog. If it works for you go for it!
    Abbey is looking for a forever home

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