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Thread: PUPPY BITING

  1. #13
    Snookie ain't got nuttin on me! Become a 4 Paw Member
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    ChanelnBrutus's Avatar
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    Default Re: PUPPY BITING

    You have gotten some great advice above! Boy oh boy I remember those shark teeth! We would redirect by giving him another toy! We used toys that we could feeze and get somewhat cold. Patience and consistency is key here! Brutus was on his back so much as a puppy still does
    Everyone wants to kiss a bullie

  2. #14
    Norwegian Rose Become a 4 Paw Member
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    Default Re: PUPPY BITING

    Hi, okay where to start? I have 2 EB puppies, they are 9 months old now , and are brother and sister. I got my pups when they were 10 months old , both were biting us all the time in the beginning. I also have 6 kids in my family that are under the age of 5, one is my Grandson, and they are all cousins. I had to find a way to curb them from biting us, but especially the kids. What I did was I made sure I handled the puppies ears, I put the outside part of my hand in their mouth, gave them food, and took food away from them as well as their treats and toys, so they would be used to this if the kids should do any of these things to them. I also taught my Grandson , who is 5 and is here about 45 hours a week, to be gentle with the pups, to pet them nice, not tease them, or pull them. I taught him that animals have feelings too, and if you pull ears or tails , they feel the same pain as people do when their hair gets pulled. I also taught him not to bug them when they were eating, and to always use an open hand when giving a treat to them. If your hand is flat and open, it is impossible for them to bite your hand. The other thing we did when the pups would bite us, or our toes, or pants, etc, is we would either grab the soft skin on the back of their neck and pull back and in a firm voice say NO, or ouch, the other thing that worked is to place your thumb in their mouth and lay it across the tongue and hold it with the chin in your hand, they can't bite when you do this. We only had to do this for a few weeks, and they stopped biting us . Good luck and I hope you find a technique that works for you.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

  3. #15
    Bulldog Vet in Training Become a 4 Paw Member
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    Default Re: PUPPY BITING

    Same thing here with my devil Otis. He's now 11 months and it is so much better, still an issue - but we also have to go the crate route because nothing else works. We let him calm down and back out he comes.
    Otis you'll never know how much I love you I love you more then all the leaves on all the trees

  4. #16
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    Default Re: PUPPY BITING

    Thanks so much for all the great ideas! Mostly I am relieved that this is normal and I am not doing something wrong! He is sooooo sweet otherwise! We'll stay the course and try to find something that works!!
    "We never really own a dog as much as they own us!"

  5. #17
    Crazy Bulldog Lady Become a 4 Paw Member
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    Default Re: PUPPY BITING

    @mer55 - Mary I pulled this information up for you, long but hope it helps some ...

    3 - 6 Months
    Stage 4 begins your puppy's introduction to independence, but may also create some possible frustrating situations for you. With her senses more or less fully developed, and her improved physical coordination, the puppy is entering into a phase that is remarkably close to toddlerhood in human beings. Think "terrible twos" on a canine level.
    During this stage, the puppy will attempt to determine the social rankings within her new "pack". This may include the same kind of play-fighting that she engaged in with her brothers and sisters, but now directed at you and the rest of her new "littermates." In wild packs, these kinds of dominance games serve a vital function. Puppy is testing her boundaries within her social circle, seeing if she has what it takes to physically challenge her peers and even you, her pack leader. If you don't step in and discourage this kind of dominance-seeking behavior early on - or, worse yet, if you allow your puppy to "win" at dominance games such as wrestling or Tug-of-War - it could set the stage for more serious challenges to your leadership down the road.
    Play-biting may also escalate during this stage, and it should be considered vitally important to correct this behavior rather than allow it to continue. Be sure to correct immediately to allow the puppy to connect the behavior with the correction, and be consistent!
    Between months 4 and 6, you may find your puppy exhibiting signs of a return to the flight phase that she went through during or around week 8. However, unlike at 8 weeks, when the puppy's flight was fueled by her reaction to the startling new environment, this new phase will be more closely associated with the independent and rebellious stage that she's going through. A collar and leash will provide the crucial physical connection between you that can keep her from bolting when you approach. Do not allow her to roam off leash in any open or highly populated public area until she demonstrates to you that she is willing to accept your commands. And don't forget your most powerful tool: your calm-assertive energy and balanced pack leadership!
    Hide your designer shoes! During stage 4, you can expect your puppy to begin teething, which means that unless you provide her with suitable chew toys to occupy herself and relieve her discomfort, she is liable to destroy some of your treasured belongings. Many people take this kind of destructive behavior as a form of "personal" rebellion by the puppy, but think about it. Doesn't it make sense that the puppy would seek out as attractive items that are most saturated with your scent? If your puppy does find and mangle a precious possession of yours, DO NOT react with anger! Remember to maintain balance and provide firm, calm corrections. Once you have corrected your puppy, immediately provide her with an acceptable substitute to make the connection in her mind. Frozen bones may provide pain relief for a dog in great discomfort and also a reward for responding to your corrections with calm-submissive energy.
    During this stage, many new owners become concerned by the sight of blood on their new puppy's chew toys. Don't panic. This is a completely natural part of this phase of the puppy's development as she begins to lose her milk teeth. Still, if you have persistent concerns, be sure to discuss the matter with your family veterinarian. Ask about proper dental care - when and how to brush (ideally once a week or more) and which products to use. Certain products such as raw bones may be perfect both for soothing the dog's chewing instincts and for removing plaque and tartar buildup around her teeth and gums.
    Finally, this stage will usher in the beginnings of sexual maturation in your puppy, which may lead to some extra frustrations. Marking and scenting can become a problem around the house even if the puppy has been successfully housebroken. The best and safest way to avoid these problems while simultaneously decreasing the chances of many future health risks is to have her sterilized if you haven't already done so. Sterilization is a still debated topic among many dog owners and veterinarians, but most veterinary professionals agree that a safe and optimal time to have the procedure done is when the puppy is about 6 months old.
    Read more: http://www.cesarsway.com/tips/puppyt...#ixzz2FNOXUSnC
    I suffer from "M.B.S." (Multiple Bulldog Syndrome)
    because one bulldog is NEVER enough!!

  6. #18
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    Default Re: PUPPY BITING

    We went through the same thing with Bacon and I still have scars from puppy shark teeth. One thing we did was to put our hand in front of his face with your palm open so he can't bite you along with a firm no, and then a suggestion of kisses. He eventually grew out of it as well, unless he is wrestling with Dad, then all bets are off.

  7. #19
    Potty Trainer
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    Default Re: PUPPY BITING

    This thread is exactly what I needed. My EB pup is constantly torturing my pug. I'm going to add some of these methods to my training.

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