Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 13 to 18 of 18

Thread: Has anyone used the Volhardart Puppy Apptitude Test (PAT) to choose a puppy from a litter??

  1. #13

    Default Re: Has anyone used the Volhardart Puppy Apptitude Test (PAT) to choose a puppy from a litter??

    [QUOTE=raghu;633544]Whoa. This sounds like a GMAT/SAT exam.

    I have picked puppies from litters before just by looking at them and seeing how they move around. Nothing this elaborate.
    Our EB Bella was a blind buy from "good lineage". She turned out mostly OK. By blind buy, I did not see the mum/dad/pup but a very good friend who is a breeder picked her up for me. If one is into serious showing and breeding it probably makes sense to go through some of this, breeder willing.

    I once had the misfortune of picking up a doberman that turned psychotic at 4 months. The guy just did not fit into our home.
    In fact he was so possessive and insecure that he seriously bit my boy who was 5 years at the time. We had to give him away to a farm where he was used as a guard dog.

    EBs are generally easy going. They are low sensitivity breed, meaning in most situations they usually just lift an eyelid and go back to snoozing.
    I feel EBs are also born confident and arrogant, so some firmness from owner is required to show them their place. This happens over a period of time.
    Longer for EBs as compared to other "intelligent" breeds.

    Here are my observations in case of Bella, done over a period of time.
    1. Social Attraction - degree of social attraction to people, confidence or dependence.
    She is a social butterfly; basks in the attention of humans and other canines

    2. Following - willingness to follow a person.
    Mostly. Sometimes she is very clear she is done listening to me

    3. Restraint - degree of dominant or submissive tendency, and ease of handling in difficult situations.
    To date have not had a difficult situation; usually manageable by coaxing or a firm NO

    4. Social Dominance - degree of acceptance of social dominance by a person.
    She will listen 95% of the time; the remaining 5% she tells me that EBs need to be respected

    5. Elevation - degree of accepting dominance while in a position of no control, such as at the veterinarian or groomer.
    No issues here. Vet's darling and very cooperative when bathing, grooming or clipping nails.

    6. Retrieving - degree of willingness to do something for you. Together with Social Attraction and Following a key indicator for ease or difficulty in training.
    Retrieving yes 100%. Giving it back to me 50%

    7. Touch Sensitivity - degree of sensitivity to touch and a key indicator to the type of training equipment required.
    Very sensitive to strangers touch. She is cautious but never aggressive. Usually takes 30 seconds to assess a new person. Once she is satisfied the feet and hand licking starts.

    8. Sound Sensitivity - degree of sensitivity to sound, such as loud noises or thunderstorms.
    Very alert on sound; if there are very loud sounds (thunder, firecrackers), she will come between my feet and just sit. If not she will go under the bed until she feels safe to come out.

    9. Sight Sensitivity - degree of response to a moving object, such as chasing bicycles, children or squirrels.
    Alert and curious; most of the time she wants to join in the play

    10. Stability - degree of startle response to a strange object.
    This is the only time I see her in the classic "don't mess with me" bulldog stance. 4 steps back, punched face, low growl and ready to defend herself.

    Cheers,
    Raghu[/QUOTE

    Raghu - Thanks for sharing your insight and taking the time to reply. I love that you made comparisons to your EB. I do believe these tests are really overkill but I also think knowing what to look for or not is helpful. I remember picking a golden retriever pup way back based on the way she looked extremely cute. Turned out to be mega hyper, ran away all the time, etc. Anyway getting all the input here is valuable whether one agree's or disagrees. Have a great day!

  2. Likes 2BullyMama liked this post
  3. #14

    Default Re: Has anyone used the Volhardart Puppy Apptitude Test (PAT) to choose a puppy from a litter??

    Quote Originally Posted by raghu View Post
    @michael

    Saw the video. Gorgeous pups
    Looks and marking wise, I personally like:
    1. the one with 2 brown ears and eyes (right most at the start of video)
    2. the squirmy one
    3. the panda
    4. the all white face

    White face means you need to spend extra time working on tear stains.

    Cheers,
    Raghu
    Thanks Raghu - Good to know on the white face!

  4. #15

    Default Re: Has anyone used the Volhardart Puppy Apptitude Test (PAT) to choose a puppy from a litter??

    Quote Originally Posted by raghu View Post
    Whoa. This sounds like a GMAT/SAT exam.

    I have picked puppies from litters before just by looking at them and seeing how they move around. Nothing this elaborate.
    Our EB Bella was a blind buy from "good lineage". She turned out mostly OK. By blind buy, I did not see the mum/dad/pup but a very good friend who is a breeder picked her up for me. If one is into serious showing and breeding it probably makes sense to go through some of this, breeder willing.

    I once had the misfortune of picking up a doberman that turned psychotic at 4 months. The guy just did not fit into our home.
    In fact he was so possessive and insecure that he seriously bit my boy who was 5 years at the time. We had to give him away to a farm where he was used as a guard dog.

    EBs are generally easy going. They are low sensitivity breed, meaning in most situations they usually just lift an eyelid and go back to snoozing.
    I feel EBs are also born confident and arrogant, so some firmness from owner is required to show them their place. This happens over a period of time.
    Longer for EBs as compared to other "intelligent" breeds.

    Here are my observations in case of Bella, done over a period of time.
    1. Social Attraction - degree of social attraction to people, confidence or dependence.
    She is a social butterfly; basks in the attention of humans and other canines

    2. Following - willingness to follow a person.
    Mostly. Sometimes she is very clear she is done listening to me

    3. Restraint - degree of dominant or submissive tendency, and ease of handling in difficult situations.
    To date have not had a difficult situation; usually manageable by coaxing or a firm NO

    4. Social Dominance - degree of acceptance of social dominance by a person.
    She will listen 95% of the time; the remaining 5% she tells me that EBs need to be respected

    5. Elevation - degree of accepting dominance while in a position of no control, such as at the veterinarian or groomer.
    No issues here. Vet's darling and very cooperative when bathing, grooming or clipping nails.

    6. Retrieving - degree of willingness to do something for you. Together with Social Attraction and Following a key indicator for ease or difficulty in training.
    Retrieving yes 100%. Giving it back to me 50%

    7. Touch Sensitivity - degree of sensitivity to touch and a key indicator to the type of training equipment required.
    Very sensitive to strangers touch. She is cautious but never aggressive. Usually takes 30 seconds to assess a new person. Once she is satisfied the feet and hand licking starts.

    8. Sound Sensitivity - degree of sensitivity to sound, such as loud noises or thunderstorms.
    Very alert on sound; if there are very loud sounds (thunder, firecrackers), she will come between my feet and just sit. If not she will go under the bed until she feels safe to come out.

    9. Sight Sensitivity - degree of response to a moving object, such as chasing bicycles, children or squirrels.
    Alert and curious; most of the time she wants to join in the play

    10. Stability - degree of startle response to a strange object.
    This is the only time I see her in the classic "don't mess with me" bulldog stance. 4 steps back, punched face, low growl and ready to defend herself.

    Cheers,
    Raghu
    Raghu - I really appreciate this info. Great stuff!! Thank you. Sorry to hear about your boy. That is terrible it happened.

  5. #16
    Head Pooper Scooper I am an EBN Reporter
    Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Need help with the forums?  Contact me!
    Davidh's Avatar
    Real Name
    David
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    13,246
    Bulldog(s) Names
    BeBe, Hazel, Lucy Lu, JLO, Hillary, Henri, & Katie
    Likes (Received)
    1556

    Default Re: Has anyone used the Volhardart Puppy Apptitude Test (PAT) to choose a puppy from a litter??

    At that age, some of the things on the list are hard to evaluate in my opinion. The biting part, is no signs of aggression at that age. All puppies bite, that's how they explore the world and play. If a 7 week old shows true aggression toward a human, there is something seriously wrong with that pup. They will have little temper tantrum toward each other if they play too hard, and they will usually throw the fit and walk off, then 5 minutes later be playing again. I say which ever one connects with you the best is usually the best one for you. The pup will usually puck their new family. I pick them for a different reason, because I am looking for the one I thing will do the best in the show ring, which includes, personality, body structure, and who I think will fit the standard the best when it matures. But an 8 week old pup sometimes is very hard to pick because they still have so much growing to do and will change as they do grow. That's why I like them to be a little older when we are picking one to show.
    Have a Great Bully Day.
    Member of The Bulldog Club of America, The Bulldog Club of Texas and French Bulldog Club of America.
    Bully hugs from - BeBe, Hazel, Lucy Lu, JLO, Hillary, Henri & Katie


  6. #17
    Rescue Volunteer cefe13's Avatar
    Country
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,749
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Castor
    Trophies
    Likes (Received)
    1358

    Default Re: Has anyone used the Volhardart Puppy Apptitude Test (PAT) to choose a puppy from a litter??

    Looks very advanced! I would think a test like that requires a professional to assess the puppy; to us it was very important to see the parents, the breeder's facilities and how the puppy interacted not only with his litter mates but also with the breeder. When looking at the type of personality issues that the test measures, I can see that Castor has fully lived up to our expectations/hopes, but there is no way I could have assessed that when we first saw him at seven weeks. And we didn't actually choose him - the breeder selected him for us from the litter. We wanted a male and there were, I think, three males still available, and already before we went there the first time the breeder had picked Castor, saying he was the one they assessed as being most suitable for our family.

    In hindsight, I know that looking at his parents was a good way of judging what would become out of him; Castor is a slightly smaller version of his dad who totally swept me off my feet when we first visited the breeder.


    Castor is on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/castorthebulldog/

  7. #18
    The Ultimate Sourmug Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    rjisaterp's Avatar
    Real Name
    Roger
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Somewhere in the Universe. Wish you were here!
    Posts
    5,141
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Jewel and Bentley
    Trophies
    Likes (Received)
    3869

    Default Re: Has anyone used the Volhardart Puppy Apptitude Test (PAT) to choose a puppy from a litter??

    Crap my bullies would have flunked this test. Bullies are family companions not getting ready to go to Harvard or even Crap gold

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Remove Ads

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •