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Thread: When will she stop being so aggresive?

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    Bulldog Vet in Training g8erjackie's Avatar
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    Default Re: When will she stop being so aggresive?

    I agree that it isn't aggression and is just bulldog puppy behavior. They can be sharks when they're little and still teething. Make sure your kids firmly tell her "no" when her play is too rough. If you're there you can back them up and correct her if she won't listen. It sounds like she loves you all a lot and just wants to play, but hasn't quite learned how to play politely.

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    Newbie Craig Chaplain's Avatar
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    Default Re: When will she stop being so aggresive?

    Quote Originally Posted by anatess View Post
    Thank you so much for serving America. My grandfather served with the US Army/Navy/Marines in World War II (I'm Filipino) and gave his life for both our countries. It is a great service that takes a lot of courage and love to do what you do.

    Your 5-month old pup's behavior is normal in most dogs that age. The typical English Bulldog behavior is playful, smart, and independent. The old English is also protective, and depending on how much pit is in the old English, could be territorial too. Puppies tend to be hyper. And for English Bulldogs, puppyhood can go on for 2 years. Then they tend to slow down as their typical body structure fills up at around that time and tends to cost a lot of energy to move. So they start conserving energy until they need it - so they show bursts of activity between long periods of rest. But, even adult English Bulldogs can run very fast and bulldoze an adult to the ground as they play when they find it hard to stop their momentum.

    With your pup living with children, the best method to discipline is to train all of them... pup and kids. For example - your kids will need to learn not to fear the puppy. Running away, screaming, etc., is going to be confusing to the puppy. Puppies takes signals from emotions as well as actions and your kids' running away will send a signal of - "yeah! Chase time!" and then the emotion of fear will send a signal of "something is hurting my friend!" or even "my friend just turned on me!"... which is confusing, so, being a puppy, he may not be well-equipped to respond properly to these signals, so it's a toss up on what he will do - chase the kids playfully, or chase the kids to protect them, or fear the kids... In this case, training the pup is not enough. The kids will need to be trained too. Make sense?

    As far as the biting... this is normal puppy behavior but it cannot be tolerated with children. So, when you sense the dog about to bite his friends, catch his attention immediately (your children can be taught to do this as well) with a sharp, serious tone. Then re-direct his attention to something he can bite - like a chew toy. Avoid playing tug-of-war with the chew toy. Tug-of-war with children encourages the dog's instinct to fight for alpha status. Your puppy will need to learn that if a child wants his toy, he will need to let go of it. So that, when you or your children are trying to distract the dog's attention with a chew toy - shake the toy infront of him to catch his attention and then hand the toy for him to chomp on and let go.

    It's okay for the dog to play with the kids but the minute the dog displays undesirable behavior, all play should stop immediately and should only resume once the dog has calmed down.

    Hope this helps.

    P.S. Forgot to address the biting with the other dogs. Since you are pretty well established alpha, it's okay to just watch this and let the other dogs correct him so he can fall in his proper place in the dog hierarchy. But, if you see it's not getting corrected, then you can issue the correction - the same way you catch the puppy's attention when he tries to bite the kids.


    Wow!!! Thank you so much for taking the kind of time to write out all that advice. I so happy with my decision to join this site, as it usually isn't in my nature to join these kind of sites.

    Roxi is taking more after the "old english" looks. She is not going to look quit like all the rest of you guys bullies. I've haven't had my own dog as an adult and I'm 38 years old. I never thought I would love a dog like I love this dog. Her and I are a perfect match for dog owner matches. She is very hard headed but I can pretty much deal with that. I just love the way she looks, her way of communicating with me, the way she plays with me all of her... She is awesome.

    I love the way you word everything in explaining what you are trying to get across to me. I don't think I ever thought of it like that, the way she thinks of the kids as her friends and the way she interprets things. Hey my friend wants me to chase her or why did my friend just start screaming at me an turn on me etc. That's a awesome way of putting it.

    I will try and incorporate my kids in training her and I will also train my kids as well as you put it. She is not mean what soever and I keep telling my fiance that she is only playing. She has her Standard Poodles which are laid back, gentle, and nice so that's what she is accustomed to.

    As far as her biting one of the other dogs testicles, he will not correct her. He is an absolute gentleman with Roxi. He is 3 times bigger than her and won't bite her and when they play together he could hurt her but he is so gentle. That dog is def a lover and not a fighter. So I am going to have to step in and teach her. I will have to use my "Alpha" position with her. It's just not right for her to do that to him. Now, the other Standard Poodle is also very gentle but he is much older. He is going on 7 and doesn't put up with her. All he has to do is look her in the eyes and she submits. It's awesome to watch how much control he as on her without having to actually do anything. It's like she really know if she pushes her limits with him he will put her in her place.

    As far as playing. I do have a question I would like you to answer. I planned on making this another thread but I'll as it here to see what feedback I get. I like to play rough with her and my fiance gets on to me about that and says doing that will make her mean towards the kids because she doesn't know better. I get down and wrestle with her, push her around, and I wrap a towel around my arm and she likes to attack it and play tug o' war. Kind like you see on t.v. with the police dog trainers but on a much smaller scale. Her and I both love doing that. So what is your take on that? Is that going to make things worse with her or not? She will only go after that one arm and only if it's covered with the towel. It's like she knows that, that I'm the only one and that is the only arm that she can attack like that. But I just don't want to keep playing with her like that if it's going to hinder her progress with the kids. Thanks again for all the input.

  3. #15
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    Default Re: When will she stop being so aggresive?

    The gang sure has you covered!! GREAT advice has been given..... I would add, to hold off on the rough play till she is more settled in and knows it is only acceptable with you. Dogs are smart and can determine the difference in how to behave in situations, so once she stops her pushing around of the kids you can then resume the rough housing -- define a space for it so she knows 'this is the ring' per say. Our girl knew that when we went to a section of the yard.... the hose was coming out and she was going to get to play and attack the water. if the hose was in a different area of the yard, she knew it was off limits. Point is, you can teach/train it, but give it time
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    Default Re: When will she stop being so aggresive?

    5 kids and 3 dogs !?!?! wowzer... My Bully is the first dog I've ever had, period.. My puppy trainer was awesome, and I read some other helpful tips at the time. The 1 thing I did, which helped a ton, was kept her on a leash literally tied to my hip.. Of course it was "weird", as people would think, but it gave me absolute control and correction at all times.. Bully's are very strong willed and stubborn. Like others suggested, you need a group effort for training and to make sure the Bully stays in check.. Cesar Milan has had plenty of Bulldogs that have been featured on this show, and it seems like the personality in general is pretty dead on.. Don't give up.. Like kids, stay with it, and it'll pay off

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