Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Pyometra infection ??

  1. #1
    agingermom's minion and cabana boy Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    jimmyjj's Avatar
    Real Name
    jimmy
    Country
    Scotland .
    Location
    A Scottish guy living in England
    Posts
    2,715
    Bulldog(s) Names
    diesel - paisley & nula
    Likes (Received)
    475

    Default Pyometra infection ??

    Can anyone shed any light on what this is.

    One of the dogs diesel has done some breeding with has caught this. I have never heard of this before.
    What is it ?

    Can it be passed on ??

  2. #2
    I'm not OCD....now who moved my bulldog? I am an EBN Reporter
    Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Need help with the forums?  Contact me!
    2BullyMama's Avatar
    Real Name
    Christine
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Gilbertsville, PA
    Posts
    40,140
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Lambeau, Chelios (Frenchie), Nitschke (2004-2011) and Banks (2005-2014)
    Trophies
    Likes (Received)
    11475

    Default Re: Pyometra infection ??

    I believe only females get it... I think, it is a infection of the uterus. I tagged Lisa and David as I think they have info
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    There is a part of your heart not alive until a bulldog has entered your lif
    e.

    Nitschke (2004-2011) and Banks (2005-2014) -- My angels
    Thank you for all the love, fun and teachings




  3. #3
    Head Pooper Scooper I am an EBN Reporter
    Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Need help with the forums?  Contact me!
    Davidh's Avatar
    Real Name
    David
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    13,246
    Bulldog(s) Names
    BeBe, Hazel, Lucy Lu, JLO, Hillary, Henri, & Katie
    Likes (Received)
    1556

    Default Re: Pyometra infection ??

    Yes, it is an infection of the uterus and is not contagious. If your female has it, she will need an emergency spay, it is a deadly infection.
    Have a Great Bully Day.
    Member of The Bulldog Club of America, The Bulldog Club of Texas and French Bulldog Club of America.
    Bully hugs from - BeBe, Hazel, Lucy Lu, JLO, Hillary, Henri & Katie


  4. #4
    agingermom's minion and cabana boy Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    jimmyjj's Avatar
    Real Name
    jimmy
    Country
    Scotland .
    Location
    A Scottish guy living in England
    Posts
    2,715
    Bulldog(s) Names
    diesel - paisley & nula
    Likes (Received)
    475

    Default Re: Pyometra infection ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Davidh View Post
    Yes, it is an infection of the uterus and is not contagious. If your female has it, she will need an emergency spay, it is a deadly infection.
    I am going round to see him on Monday after work. Just wanted a bit of info on it.
    Thanks Again

  5. #5
    Head Pooper Scooper I am an EBN Reporter
    Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Need help with the forums?  Contact me!
    Davidh's Avatar
    Real Name
    David
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    13,246
    Bulldog(s) Names
    BeBe, Hazel, Lucy Lu, JLO, Hillary, Henri, & Katie
    Likes (Received)
    1556

    Default Re: Pyometra infection ??

    @jimmyjj is the blood bright red? Usually when they bleed with Pyometra, the discharge will look sort of like chocolate milk. When they are in heat it will look like dark blood.
    Have a Great Bully Day.
    Member of The Bulldog Club of America, The Bulldog Club of Texas and French Bulldog Club of America.
    Bully hugs from - BeBe, Hazel, Lucy Lu, JLO, Hillary, Henri & Katie


  6. #6
    EBN's SWEETHEART aka our little GOOB Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Need help with the forums?  Contact me!
    ddnene's Avatar
    Real Name
    Tracey
    Country
    USA
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Posts
    12,722
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Willow (2015) Walter (2014) Winston (2012-13) Wellie (2012-13) Bella (2007-13)
    Likes (Received)
    5562

    Default Re: Pyometra infection ??

    Pyometra is VERY serious, that baby needs to be spayed pronto… It's one of the reasons that vets suggest spaying a female if you are NOT planning to breed them.

    "What we once enjoyed and deeply loved, we can never lose, for all that we love deeply becomes a part of us." Helen Keller
    RIP Wellie, Bella, Winston & Roxie

  7. #7
    Norwegian Rose Become a 4 Paw Member
    I Have Earned Community Veteran Status!
    Vikinggirl's Avatar
    Real Name
    Monica
    Country
    Canada
    Location
    Burlington, ON Canada
    Posts
    9,636
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Bulldozer and Blossom
    Likes (Received)
    2118

    Default Re: Pyometra infection ??

    Pyometra is a disease mainly of middle-aged female dogs that have not been spayed. In the past, we thought pyometra was simply a uterine infection, but today, we know that it is a hormonal abnormality, and a secondary bacterial infection may or may not be present. Pyometra follows a heat cycle in which fertilization did not occur. Typically, within two to four months after the cycle, the female starts showing signs of the disease.


    What causes pyometra?


    The two main hormones produced by the ovaries are estrogen and progesterone. An excessive quantity of progesterone, or the uterus becoming oversensitive to it, causes pyometra. In either case, cysts form in the lining of the uterus. These cysts contain numerous secretory cells, and large quantities of fluids are produced and released into the interior of the uterus.


    This fluid, along with a thickening of the walls of the uterus, brings about a dramatic increase in the overall size of this organ. The uterus is made up of a body with two horns. In the unaffected dog or cat, the horns are smaller than a common pencil. However, in cases of pyometra, they become large, sac-like pouches the circumference of cucumbers and 12 to 18 inches long. Normally, the entire uterus in a 40-pound dog will weigh two to four ounces, but in cases of pyometra, this typically ranges from one to four pounds.


    As the disease continues, fluid spills out of the vagina causing the animal to lick this area in an attempt to keep itself clean. Bacteria commonly colonize the uterus by entering through the cervix. This produces an even greater response by the body, as it showers additional fluid and white blood cells into the affected organ.


    After a while, the cervix closes. This effectively traps all of the fluid within the uterus. Still, the body continues to transfer more fluid and white blood cells into the organ, causing even further dilatation and growth. The uterus can rupture, spilling its contents into the abdominal cavity. If this occurs, the dog or cat usually dies in less than 48 hours. In most cases, this does not happen.


    The body will attempt to eliminate the problem by carrying the wastes and excess fluid through the bloodstream to the kidneys. However, the amount of material in a dog with pyometra is too great to be eliminated in this fashion, overloading the kidney system. The normal toxins that should be excreted from the body build up, and the animal goes into uremic poisoning. Untreated, she will die from kidney failure.


    Symptoms


    As the body attempts to flush out the build-up of waste products through the kidneys, the animal will drink excessive quantities of water (polydipsia) and urinate large amounts frequently (polyuria). She will lick at her vaginal area while the cervix is still open and the uterus is discharging a white fluid. She may run a low-grade fever and if blood work is done, she will show an elevated white blood cell count. As the uterus increases in size and weight, the dog shows weakness in the rear legs, often to the point where she cannot rise without help. As the dog enters kidney failure, she stops eating and becomes very lethargic.


    Treatment


    Since toxicity may develop very quickly in dogs with pyometra, it needs to be treated promptly. Dogs will receive intravenous fluids, usually for several days, and antibiotics. In most cases, the preferred treatment is a complete ovariohysterectomy (spay). This removes the ovaries, oviducts, uterus, and all associated blood vessels. These animals can be a surgical challenge because of their poor overall condition. In some females valued for breeding, prostaglandin and antibiotic therapy may be tried instead of surgery. The prostaglandin is given for 5-7 days and causes the uterus to contract and expel the fluid. In mild cases, when the cervix is still open and the fluid is draining, the success rate is excellent. This therapy should only be used in dogs 6 years of age or younger, who are in stable condition, and have an open cervix. Prostaglandins can have side effects, especially after the first dose, including restlessness, panting, vomiting, increased heart rate, fever, and defecation.


    Prevention


    The best prevention is to have all female animals spayed at or before six months of age. If the animal is used for breeding, then spaying the animal after she is past her breeding years is highly recommended. Pyometra is a fairly common and serious problem and is just one of many compelling reasons to have your female pet spayed at an early age.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •