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Thread: Color Change

  1. #1
    Potty Trainer Poohusmc's Avatar
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    Default Color Change

    -20131218_205308-jpgHey All, I am new to this site and have a question that I have not seen posted and was wondering if anyone knows the answer. My bulldog Willie G looks like his color is changing on his sides, becoming dark or brindle. His normal color is Fawn and White. He is 15 months old. I called the breeder and she said it maybe just that but I was wondering if anyone here has heard of that. I am attaching a couple of photos. Let me know -20140421_174019-jpg-20140421_174111-jpg-20140421_174123-jpg
    Last edited by Poohusmc; 04-26-2014 at 04:46 PM. Reason: add picture

  2. #2
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    2BullyMama's Avatar
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    Default Re: Color Change

    Seasonal flank alapocia (spelling). ..... Melatonin helps. I tagged a member that has a bully with this
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    Default Re: Color Change

    Have a vet check it, however it looks like SFA Seasonal Flank alopecia.. No 'cure' just looks bad, but no effect on health. Vet should check for thyroid issues... But it will most likely be negative... Don't waste money on skin tests. Melatonin helps some Missing Link helped, but Gizmo's is still here 3 years later.... Hope post works on phone

  4. #4
    Potty Trainer Poohusmc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Color Change

    Thank you..he had his thyroid checked in January and it was negative.. This started last month ..she I have it checked again? I will get him some melatonin tomorrow.

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    Bully Bootie Duty Julzz9170's Avatar
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    Default Re: Color Change

    My fawn and white bully is going to be 5 this year and he has had seasonal flank allopecia the past 3 springs..it lasts a few months and then his hair just grows back fine..my 3 year old brindle got it last year for the first time and his hair only grew back on one side..he has a bald spot on his right side

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Color Change

    Hi, looks like everyone has you covered regarding Seasonal Alopecia, I'm sorry I don't have any experience with this, and have never heard of it in dogs, but looked it up for you:


    Seasonal affective disorder can be culprit for canine hair loss


    Apr 1, 2003
    By: Alice M. Jeromin, RPh, DVM, DACVD
    DVM360 MAGAZINE




    Alice Jeromin DVM, Dipl. ACVD


    Coming off of a long, dark winter as we are in the Midwest, we're confronted with a unique disease seen in certain breeds of dogs. Light responsive alopecia or seasonal flank alopecia is most often seen at this time of the year. It is not well understood but is thought to be from lack of sunlight exposure to the pineal gland. The pineal gland is located at the base of the brain and is the gland responsible for telling bears to hibernate and perhaps telling us to crawl into bed early during these long winters, eat fatty foods, and in general, not have much energy.
    These changes are not recognized in dogs but physical changes such as truncal alopecia and hyperpigmentation are evident. Light responsive alopecia is logically more common in those areas of the country with dark winters such as the Midwest, the Plains states, parts of New England and Canada. Studies of seasonal affective disorder in humans show an incidence of 2 percent in Florida vs. 10 percent in New Hampshire. When seen in other parts of the country or at other times of the year it may be evident that affected dogs are house bound during the daylight hours for a prolonged period of time. For example, the owner leaves before dawn and arrives home after sunset so the dog is exposed to virtually no natural sunlight. It is not known whether the disease is comparable between humans and animals but what is certain is that a photo period plays a role in both.




    Examples of truncal alopecia and hyperpigmentation in various breeds with seasonal flank alopecia.


    Diagnosis Clinically, the patient is affected with alopecia in a bilaterally symmetrical pattern usually involving the flanks with progressive involvement over the dorsal lumbar area. The hair loss is nonpruritic and may be accompanied by hyperpigmentation and follicular keratosis. The typical clinical picture involves the bilateral flanks but other areas such as the dorsal nasal planum, periocular area, preauricular areas and lateral pinna may be involved. There is no sex predilection and the disease may be hereditary as in our practice we had a mother and daughter Boxer affected. Breeds affected include the Boxer, English Bulldog, French Bulldog, Airedale, Doberman Pinscher, Bouvier de Flanders, Scottish Terrier, Shar Pei, Labrador Retriever, Giant Schnauzer and Akita. Differential diagnoses include hypothyroidism, Cushing's disease and alopecia X.
    The diagnosis is made by noting the breed affected, areas of the body affected, time of the year the patient is affected, and by performing skin biopsies. Skin biopsies may include follicular atrophy, "foot-like" comedones with excess keratin plugging of the follicular infundibula, normal epidermal thickness, and hyperpigmentation of the basal cell layer.


    Treatment Treatment includes more sunlight exposure and/or melatonin beginning Sept. 23 through March 23 (vernal equinox). The prognosis is good with most patients regrowing hair upon more sun exposure, however some patients skip a year before they regrow hair and some may not regrow hair completely or at all. This appears to be a benign disease but the more common diseases resulting in bilaterally symmetrical alopecia such as Cushing's disease and hypothyroidism should be ruled out.




    It is uncertain how the lack of sunlight to the pineal gland results in alopecia of certain specific areas of the body. The role of melatonin release by this gland upon lack of sunlight exposure via the eyes results in depression and lethargy in humans. Prolactin may also play a role as its concentration in the body may be affected by photo period changes and Serotonin concentrations in humans are reduced in dark, cold environments. Oral doses of Melatonin at a range of 3-24mg/day may be helpful in light responsive alopecia. In Canada melatonin injections have been administered on mink farms to cause production of thick coats nonseasonally for the fur industry. It is possible that melatonin injections are more effective than oral melatonin tablets however melatonin injections can be painful. Melatonin has many actions ranging from contraception to use as an antianxiety agent. Its action in seasonal flank alopecia still remains controversial.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

  7. #7
    Dog Park Attendant 4flowers's Avatar
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    Default Re: Color Change

    I had a american bulldog with this. Was told to give melatonin at night before bed. Hope it helps.

  8. #8
    Pooper scooper BullyLove143's Avatar
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    Default Re: Color Change

    My bully has this as well. It's really bad this time around. I also give melatonin and I recently bought Nu-Stock to rub on the bald areas. It's a topical cream that apparently can make hair grow on a tennis ball. Only 3 ingredients.


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  9. #9
    Potty Trainer Poohusmc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Color Change

    Thanks everyone for the tips..I started the melatonin and fish oil 😊

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