Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 25 to 30 of 30

Thread: Why are mostly other breeds agressive towards bullies?

  1. #25
    Bully Bootie Duty Become a 4 Paw Member Trod1's Avatar
    Real Name
    Tina
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    168
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Olive, Oscar
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Re: Why are mostly other breeds agressive towards bullies?

    I have not had the experience you describe with other breeds but I am sad to say the experience you shared with the pit bull is as much a problem with the owner as the dog. Anyone who finds humor in "unprovoked aggressive behavior" shouldn't be a dog owner of a pitbull or other dog. It's extremely irresponsible and many attentive pit bull owners feel this type of response is what gives pit bulls a bad name.

  2. #26
    Pet Sitter Corlando465's Avatar
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    373
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Tank
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trod1 View Post
    I have not had the experience you describe with other breeds but I am sad to say the experience you shared with the pit bull is as much a problem with the owner as the dog. Anyone who finds humor in "unprovoked aggressive behavior" shouldn't be a dog owner of a pitbull or other dog. It's extremely irresponsible and many attentive pit bull owners feel this type of response is what gives pit bulls a bad name.
    AGREED! Pits are great dogs, but just require their masters to be Alphas and give lots of love, exercise and training. Too many Pits get bad raps when it's really their owners that are to blame. There is no humor in aggressive behavior and there never should be, even in professionally trained dogs.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  3. #27
    Bulldog Walker malaviKat's Avatar
    Country
    Canada
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    250
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Chance
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default Re: Why are mostly other breeds agressive towards bullies?

    This is a wonderful, important, conversation (albeit a sensitive one) so I'm glad we're having it here. I cannot offer much insight in terms of how to make bulldogs more approachable so any advice is welcome!

    I have heard that one of the reasons bulldogs are misunderstood is because of their rolling gait. It doesn't "look" right to other dogs. I don't know how true that is... but if it helps us understand, I'll take it.

    We have socialized Chance from the day we brought him home. With other bulldogs, he is fine. With other dogs (small and large) that he has known from a young age (including Pomeranians, Labs and Vizslas) he is fine. But, he is a reactionary dog and due to what everyone has mentioned above re: the way bulldogs greet, he tends to rub many dogs the wrong way. They inevitably end up growling at him, and he mouths off something fierce. I try to do the sit/stay with him when he is meeting dogs on a leash. When I take him to our local indoor dog park around trainers he has known from puppyhood, they turn his butt to the other dog to force proper socialization. He is still mouthy if another dog starts up but this usually helps most dogs get to know him. He isn't really an aggressive dog though... he will run away from a Miniature Pinscher who loves to think he can beat him up.

    Of course, in our situation it does not help that Chance is still unfixed. I know that because of it I look like an irresponsible nut job dog owner when I am anything but.

  4. #28
    "Slug Assassin" and PBS Gardening Dweeb Vicaroo1000's Avatar
    Real Name
    Vicki
    Location
    Mukilteo, Washington State
    Posts
    5,794
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Beefeater's Buxom Beatrice and Lord Harrington's Bodacious Beauregaard
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Default Re: Why are mostly other breeds agressive towards bullies?

    Bea and Bo are NOT aggressive in any way but I can tell you that an "incident" WILL OCCUR if any of the following are true:
    1) I am nervous or unsure -- that travels right down the leash to the dog. Always.
    2) I am not taking a pack leader role in the meeting. That is, if the dog is controlling the meeting - not me. I bring the dog to the meeting -- the dog doesn't bring me.
    3) I've not done my job as a pack leader and not correctly interpreted the behavior of the on-coming dog (who might be aggressive, fearful, or in general, unbalanced). As their pack leader is MY JOB to interpret the behavior of other folks' dogs. This is for two reasons; I have Flat Nosed, head held high bully PUPS who are still learning and who's behavior is often being misinterpreted by other dogs. And secondly: because not all dog owners are truly aware of what the hell is going on with their dogs.

    A great example of this:
    There's a woman we encounter on our walks who will RUN OUT of her house to see Bo and Bea when we go by. She got a rescue Puggle and so badly wanted her dog to be "friends" with her two favorite visitors. Fine. We wait for the Puggle to come outside on his leash.

    Mistake #1 - I did NOT bring my dogs to the meeting. The pug came to US.
    Good thing #1 - The lady brought the Puggle close enough to sniff the air but not close enough for one on one face sniffing. We visited while the three dogs sniffed the air -- around each other --- for a minute.

    Mistake #2 - I get nervous and that travels RIGHT DOWN THE LEASH to Bea who then gets a bit snarly - defensive/fearful - with the Puggle.
    Good thing #2 - I know, as a pack leader, that this WILL cause a chain reaction with Bo. So I throw my leg out between the Puggle and Bo (I am saying "I am in control of this meeting") and I first disagree with Bea's behavior (ACCCK!) and then I swoop down and spin Bea around so her butt is in the Puggles face. I hold her there for fifteen/twenty seconds and the Puggle gets a good snoot full which then let's alllllllll the air is let out of Bea's pissy balloon.

    All this happened -- truly -- in a matter of a few minutes. The rest of the time, the dogs sniffed each other and Bo tried to get the Puggle to play with him (play bowing). All in all, a pretty good meeting for two strange dogs meeting a rescue with unknown issues on the rescue's territory! Not too shabby! It could have gone far worse. The woman has rescued many dogs over the years and has a strong basis of knowledge as well. She was feeling confident and calm and the Pug, of course, reacted to her calm assertive energy.

    I hope this story helps someone. It's practical application stories like this one that help me.

  5. #29
    Arts'y bulldog farts'y Become a 4 Paw Member ModernFemme's Avatar
    Real Name
    Jane
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    882
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Sir Remington (Remi)
    Likes (Received)
    0
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Omg so glad I found this thread. This is totally my experience as well. Going to read all comments and absorb like a sponge.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD



  6. #30
    Bully Bootie Duty Deniztokcan's Avatar
    Location
    Vancouver British Columbia
    Posts
    178
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Cappu
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicaroo1000 View Post
    Bea and Bo are NOT aggressive in any way but I can tell you that an "incident" WILL OCCUR if any of the following are true:
    1) I am nervous or unsure -- that travels right down the leash to the dog. Always.
    2) I am not taking a pack leader role in the meeting. That is, if the dog is controlling the meeting - not me. I bring the dog to the meeting -- the dog doesn't bring me.
    3) I've not done my job as a pack leader and not correctly interpreted the behavior of the on-coming dog (who might be aggressive, fearful, or in general, unbalanced). As their pack leader is MY JOB to interpret the behavior of other folks' dogs. This is for two reasons; I have Flat Nosed, head held high bully PUPS who are still learning and who's behavior is often being misinterpreted by other dogs. And secondly: because not all dog owners are truly aware of what the hell is going on with their dogs.

    A great example of this:
    There's a woman we encounter on our walks who will RUN OUT of her house to see Bo and Bea when we go by. She got a rescue Puggle and so badly wanted her dog to be "friends" with her two favorite visitors. Fine. We wait for the Puggle to come outside on his leash.

    Mistake #1 - I did NOT bring my dogs to the meeting. The pug came to US.
    Good thing #1 - The lady brought the Puggle close enough to sniff the air but not close enough for one on one face sniffing. We visited while the three dogs sniffed the air -- around each other --- for a minute.

    Mistake #2 - I get nervous and that travels RIGHT DOWN THE LEASH to Bea who then gets a bit snarly - defensive/fearful - with the Puggle.
    Good thing #2 - I know, as a pack leader, that this WILL cause a chain reaction with Bo. So I throw my leg out between the Puggle and Bo (I am saying "I am in control of this meeting") and I first disagree with Bea's behavior (ACCCK!) and then I swoop down and spin Bea around so her butt is in the Puggles face. I hold her there for fifteen/twenty seconds and the Puggle gets a good snoot full which then let's alllllllll the air is let out of Bea's pissy balloon.

    All this happened -- truly -- in a matter of a few minutes. The rest of the time, the dogs sniffed each other and Bo tried to get the Puggle to play with him (play bowing). All in all, a pretty good meeting for two strange dogs meeting a rescue with unknown issues on the rescue's territory! Not too shabby! It could have gone far worse. The woman has rescued many dogs over the years and has a strong basis of knowledge as well. She was feeling confident and calm and the Pug, of course, reacted to her calm assertive energy.

    I hope this story helps someone. It's practical application stories like this one that help me.
    Thank you thank you thank you !

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •