Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Protein / puppy's weight

  1. #1
    Newbie WilmasMom's Avatar
    Country
    USA
    Posts
    22
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Wilma
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Protein / puppy's weight

    Question about protein, I have 4 month EB, she weighs about 32# Or so.. What is protein % that labels should read for a pup her age? I heard shouldn't have a lot of protein , don't want them getting too big too fast??
    Also that seems kinda heavy, what were your pups weight at that age??
    Woof!

  2. #2
    .................
    Real Name
    Becky
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    14,938
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Jake
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default Re: Protein / puppy's weight

    @cowsmom might be able to help with this!

  3. #3
    Doggie Boutique Owner christyjulene's Avatar
    Real Name
    Christy
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    831
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Abbey
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Re: Protein / puppy's weight

    Quote Originally Posted by WilmasMom View Post
    Question about protein, I have 4 month EB, she weighs about 32# Or so.. What is protein % that labels should read for a pup her age? I heard shouldn't have a lot of protein , don't want them getting too big too fast??
    Also that seems kinda heavy, what were your pups weight at that age??
    Woof!
    Welcome to EBN! Here is an article that I refer to about food. I did not have Abbey when she was a puppy so I don't know how much she weighed. I do know that Bullies come in all shapes, sizes and weights. Others will be by to chat!

    Protein requirements
    Protein requirements vary from species to species and can vary greatly during the rapid growth stages and for elderly animals with compromised kidneys. I will explain some of the special circumstances that require altered levels of protein but as a rule the following levels apply.

    Species and Growth Stage Recommended Protein % Recommended Fat %
    Puppy 28% 17%
    Adult dog 18% 9-15%
    Performance dog 25% 20%
    Racing sled dog 35% 50%
    Lactating dog 28% 17%
    Pregnant and lactating dogs may need to be fed puppy chow to give them the necessary protein. Sick, weak, and debilitated animals also need extra protein. Animals with kidney disease may need to be on a protein-restricted, but high biological value diet to lessen the effects of the kidney disease.
    Can I feed too much protein?
    The answer to this is yes and no. In theory, if a healthy animal eats too much protein, some gets excreted in the urine and the rest just gets used as calories or is converted to fat and does not cause any harm. Protein is the most expensive ingredient in the food and why pay for more than you need. Most pet food companies strike a happy medium and meet the minimum recommended requirements and add a little extra to be safe.
    Interpreting the pet food label
    This is where the hard part comes in. You now have two choices. The first is to buy a reputable quality brand of dog food for the activity level of your dog and hope that its needs are being met. This is what most owners do and the average dog does just fine. But if you have a dog with special protein needs or want to search out the best possible food for the money then you must dive into the label and try to interpret it.
    If you have been reading so far, you know that not all proteins are created equal. The listing of protein level on the bag or can is not a listing of the percent of digestible protein, just a listing of percent protein. So we need to know how to interpret the pet food label. We know that in quality foods digestibility is between 70 and 80%. In lesser quality foods the digestibility could drop to 60% or less. The way to determine the digestibility is not very scientific but is the best we have until the pet food industry begins to list digestibility. By reading the ingredients and noting the order that they appear we can roughly determine the digestibility. The ingredients are listed in order of weight. If the first ingredient is chicken or lamb or other meat, we can assume it is a good quality protein source. Meat meals such as lamb meal also provide quality protein. "Meat and bone meal" is an ingredient that is less desirable. If grains are listed, they are not as digestible sources of protein and contribute heavily toward the carbohydrate load. Some companies will list a meat source and then three different forms of corn, hiding the fact that the main ingredient is corn but just divided into three different products.







    Abbey is looking for a forever home

  4. #4
    ..........
    Real Name
    Sandra
    Country
    usa
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,010
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Sarah aka cow
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default Re: Protein / puppy's weight

    im not sure about weight as i did not get sarah as a puppy but i think most puppy food is like 27 or 28% for the most part. you can just use a puppy food and then you wont have to worry about it really. lots here use fromm puppy.

  5. #5
    Newbie WilmasMom's Avatar
    Country
    USA
    Posts
    22
    Bulldog(s) Names
    Wilma
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Re: Protein / puppy's weight

    Thank u for the help!!

Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •