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Thread: Not sure what to think now

  1. #1
    Kennel Cleaner MelanieNormansMom's Avatar
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    Default Not sure what to think now

    My vet for Norm was curious about the food I was feeding and asked me to bring in the bag for him to see. Overall he was really positive about it but said his opinion was that the Fromm Beed Fritata was too high protein 30% and fat 18%. I know there's a lot here that feed it with good results. I really liked the vet but now I wonder.....am I being silly or is he?

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    Bulldog Vet in Training bluesteelapd's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    Did he follow that up with I think Norm is too small or too big? Did he have any other suggestions on what type of dog food *he* thought you should feed?

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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    Both vets we use say Bulldogs aren't active enough to require a high protein food and it can be hard on their kidneys. Ruggles food is 29% protein and our vets expressed concern. Buster's Canidae All Life Stages is 21% protein; the vets approve!

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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    We have feed that food and have had good results. Some times vets don't always get the food thing right.
    Have a Great Bully Day.
    Member of The Bulldog Club of America, The Bulldog Club of Texas and French Bulldog Club of America.
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    Default

    There is a lot of controversy over protein amounts. I think a lot has to do with where the protein is coming from.

    I know if I change food to a less protein as I've tried in the past I don't get the same results. I've seen many have great success with even higher protein, and one can't argue about raw diet which is pretty much pure protein at its finest. Also you feed a lot less with this food that you would a lower protein food, so in the end are they really getting more?

    These are just random thoughts I've had over the years about protein, nothing has any concrete evidence, just my mind rambling.


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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    do you guys go on the low end or high end of fromm feeding scale? my sister is a vet and she thinks royal is a good food....I really do not think most vets research food very much and as along as you stay away from the grocery store crap they think what your feeding is good.

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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    Quote Originally Posted by erniesmom View Post
    do you guys go on the low end or high end of fromm feeding scale? my sister is a vet and she thinks royal is a good food....I really do not think most vets research food very much and as along as you stay away from the grocery store crap they think what your feeding is good.
    I feed on low end... Banks is 7.5 yrs old @ 61lbs and she gets 1 cup in AM and 1 cup in PM. And, you are 100% correct on most vets know nothing about food, they just know what they sell from the office.
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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    I looked this up and copied and pasted it

    Old wives tales about dry dog foods high in protein causing kidney disease run rampant both on and off the internet and many people deprive their dogs of what they crave most for fear of damaging their health.


    Unfortunately the whole protein thing is not easily explained in just a few sentences, so bear with me if I ramble on for a while. I'll try to keep it as simple and straightforward as possible without going too much into scientific terms.


    First of all, it is important that we understand that protein isn't only a nutrient - the amino acids it is made up of (think lego bricks forming a bigger structure) also serve as building blocks for body tissues, organs, enzymes, hormones, antibodies and so on - roughly half of the dry body mass of a dog consists of protein. Knowing this it is easy to understand that growing puppies need protein to build above mentioned body tissues, organs, enzymes, hormones, antibodies and both adults and growing puppies constantly need to replace and rebuild these as well. The body recycles amino acids to some extent, but part of them need to be replaced, just like you can't endlessly recycle paper or plastic.


    Protein is processed in the liver and any waste materials are filtered and excreted by the kidneys. High quality protein does not generate large amounts of waste that needs to be removed from the body, but poor quality protein which is difficult to digest does and thus puts stress on the kidneys. The liver needs water to process protein and as a medium to carry waste products to the kidneys, where they are filtered out and most of the water is reabsorbed. The less concentrated the waste products in this primary filtrate are, the easier it is for the kidneys to do their filtering work - that's why it is unhealthy to feed dry food only and so critical that dogs eating mostly or exclusively dry food and dogs with liver disease get lots of extra water. Dogs who eat mostly canned food or a home prepared diet automatically take in more moisture and do not need to compensate as much by drinking. Contrary to what many people think and pet food companies claim, dogs (and cats) do not know instinctively how much extra water they have to drink to make up for what is lacking in the dry food. This is why I so highly recommend that people always add water to the kibble at feeding time.


    Now that we have the basics laid out, we can return to the protein in the food. Many people cite old, outdated research that claims high protein percentages in the food are harmful to dogs and do all kinds of damage, especially to the liver. Fact is that these studies were conducted by feeding dogs foods that were made from poor quality, hard to digest protein sources, such as soy, corn, byproducts, blood meal and so on. From my explanation above, you now already know that it is a question of protein quality that affects the kidneys. Consider a wolf in the wild, who will eat relatively little else but meat if they can help it - these animals don't get kidney diseases on the same scale domestic dogs do. Their protein comes in the form of quality muscle and organ meat though, not processed leftovers from human food processing. It also contains around 70% moisture, whereas most commercial dry foods contain a maximum of 10%. Dogs and other "dog like" animals (canids) evolved eating a diet that consists primarily of meat, fat and bones, which they have been eating for hundreds of thousands of years. Commercial foods, especially dry food, has only been widely available for the past 60 years and we are still learning how much damage certain aspects of it can do. Things have improved quite a bit from hitting rock bottom in the 70s and 80s, but the majority of pet food manufacturers still produce bad foods from poor quality ingredients.


    Just to digress for a moment, when I went to the grocery storeyesterday, I saw that Purina Dog Chow was on sale, $8 for a 22 pound bag. That's a little over 36 cents per pound, including the profit the supermarket makes on it, cost for the pretty, colorful packaging, advertising and all. On top of that, of course the manufacturer (Nestle/Purina) wants to make a profit too. How much do you think the food actually costs them just to make, without any profits? The answer is pennies per pound, which also reflects the ingredient quality. If I calculate a 40% profit margin for each the supermarket and the manufacturer, it comes to about 13 cents per pound. That's $260 per ton of food. Yikes.


    Anyway, back to the protein. Protein in dog food can come from either plant or meat sources. Logically, plant sources are cheaper, especially considering that corn gluten meal, the most popular, cheap protein booster, is a byproduct of the human food processing industry, left over from making corn starch and corn syrup. It has a crude protein content of 60%, so theoretically even if your food recipe contained no other protein sources at all, you could make a food with a 20% crude protein content by mixing it 1:2 with some cheap carb source.


    It is critical to stress that the term "crude protein" is used in the guaranteed analysis, which means there is no statement whatsoever as to its digestibility. Protein comes in many forms, even shoe leather, chicken feathers or cow hooves have a fairly high crude protein content, but the body is only able to extract and process very little of it, at the price of a lot of work and stress to do so.


    Due to this labeling issue (only one of many, many others), the percentage of protein in a food by itself doesn't say anything at all. Ingredient lists are not 100% straightforward and truthful either, but at least you can somewhat gauge if there's even any quality protein in there at all.


    Just to illustrate once again by example, let's say we have two foods which have the same percentages of protein, fat, carbohydrates, fiber and moisture. Food A contains 25% protein that is 60% digestible and food B contains 25% protein that is 85% digestible. That means of food A the body is able to utilize 15% of the protein content, but of food B 21.25%. Logically, to meet the body's requirement of protein, you'd have to feed more of food A than of food B, and the body of the dog eating food B will have to work less to utilize it.


    I guess in really simple terms you can compare it to the engine of a car and the type of fuel you use. Just because you use high octane gas in a car that doesn't need it, it's not going to do any damage, but if you use poor quality fuel, regardless whether it is high or low octane, there will be buildup in the engine that hampers performance and will eventually lead to damage.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    Aug
    30
    2011
    Feeding English Bulldog
    Posted by admins in Feeding Your English Bulldog
    Some English Bulldog owners like to fill a bowl with dog food and leave it out all day, letting the dog munch at will. Although it may be convenient, it is not a good idea for several reasons. First of all, outdoors the bowl of food may attract birds, squirrels, and ants. Indoors, the food may attract ants, flies, and cockroaches. In addition, the food could become rancid.
    When you are housetraining your puppy, free feeding makes it difficult to set up a routine. Your Bulldog puppy will need to relieve herself after eating, and if she munches all day long, you won’t be able to tell when she should go outside.
    Last, but certainly not least, psychologically your dog needs to know that you are the giver of the food. How better for her to learn it than when you hand her a bowl twice a day? If the food is always available, you are not the one giving it. It’s always there – at least as far as your dog is concerned.


    How Much?


    Each and every English Bulldog needs a different amount of food. When puppies are growing quickly they will need more food. When your English Bulldog is all grown up, if she continues eating that same amount of food, she will get fat. The dog’s individual body metabolism, activity rate, and lifestyle all affect her nutritional needs.
    Most dog food manufacturers print a chart on the bag showing how much to feed your dog. It’s important to note that these are suggested guidelines. If your puppy or dog is soft, round, and fat, cut back on the food. If your dog is thin and always hungry, give her more food. A healthy, well-nourished dog will have bright eyes, an alert expression, a shiny coat, supple skin, and energy to work and play.


    Meal Times


    Most experts recommend that puppies eat two to three times a day. Most adult dogs do very well with two meals, ten or twelve hours apart, so feed your Bulldog after you eat breakfast and then again after you have dinner.
    While you are eating, don’t feed your English Bulldog from the table or toss her scraps; it will cause her to beg from anyone at the table – a very bad habit. Don’t toss her leftovers as you are cooking, either. That can lead to begging and even stealing in the kitchen. Bulldogs are bright enough to figure out how to open cupboard doors and are bold enough to raid the kitchen trash can.


    Treats


    An occasional dog biscuit or some training treats will not spoil your Bulldog’s appetite, but don’t get in the habit of offering treats just for the pleasure of it.
    Many dogs are overweight, and obesity is a leading killer of English Bulldogs. Unfortunately, with their ever-present appetite and their love of comfort, Bulldogs do tend to gain weight easily.
    When you do offer treats, offer either treats made specifically for dogs or something that is low in calories and nutritious, like a carrot. Don’t offer candy, cookies, leftover tacos, or anything like that. Your Bulldog doesn’t need sugar, chocolate is deadly for dogs, and spicy foods can cause diarrhea and an upset stomach. Play it safe and give your Bulldog good-quality nutritious snacks very sparingly.
    If you are using treats to train your English Bulldog, use good ones – nutritious treats – and cut back on all other treats. Training treats can be tiny pieces of cooked meats such as chicken or beef; just dice the pieces very small. Cheese is also a great training treat. Cut it into tiny pieces, put it in a sandwich bag, and toss it in the freezer. Bring out a few frozen pieces for each training session. (Cheese is easy to handle when frozen, and your dog won’t mind).


    Five Mistakes to Avoid
    1. Don’t feed your English Bulldog chocolate, raisins, grapes, macadamia nuts, onions, or any highly spiced, greasy, or salty foods. The first five can be toxic, and spicy or junk foods can lead to an upset stomach.
    2. Don’t believe all the dog food advertising you see and hear. Keep in mind that advertising has one goal: to get you to buy that product.
    3. If you change foods for any reason, don’t do it all at once. Mix the foods so that the dog has 25 percent new food and 75% old food for a week. Then feed half and half for a week. Finally, offer 75% new food and 25% old food for a week. This will decrease the chances of an upset stomach. If your Bulldog develops diarrhea during the switching process, you’re making the change too quickly.
    4. Don’t feed your English Bulldog from the table. This will lead to begging and even stealing. Feed her in her own spot after the family has eaten.
    5. Raw food diets are very popular, including those that recommend giving the dog raw bones. Be careful giving your English Bulldog any bones except raw beef knucklebones. Adult Bulldogs have powerful jaws and could crack, splinter, and ingest smaller bones with the potential of damage to the gastrointestinal system.


    Tags: Feeding+English+Bulldog, English+Bulldog
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    Aug
    29
    2011
    English Bulldog – Homemade Diets
    Posted by admins in Feeding Your English Bulldog
    English Bulldog owners who feed homemade diets usually do so because they are concerned about the quality of commercially available foods. Some owners do not want their dogs eating the additives or preservatives that are in many commercial dog foods. Others cook their dog’s food so that they can control exactly what their English Bulldogs eat. Many people began making homemade diets for their dogs during and after the pet food recalls of 2007.


    English Bulldog Food vs People Food
    Many of the foods we eat are excellent sources of nutrients – after all, we do just fine on them. But dogs, like us, need the right combination of meat and other ingredients for a complete and balanced diet, and a bowl of meat doesn’t provide that. In the wild, dogs eat the fur, skin, bones, and guts of their prey, and even the contents of the stomach.
    This doesn’t mean your dog can’t eat what you eat. A little meat, dairy, bread, some fruits, or vegetables as a treat are great. Just remember, we’re talking about the same food you eat, not the gristly, greasy leftovers you would normally toss in the trash. Stay away from sugar, too, and remember that chocolate and alcohol are toxic to English Bulldogs.
    If you want to share your food with your Bulldog, be sure the total amount you give her each day doesn’t make up more than 15% of her diet, and that the rest of what you feed her is a top-quality complete and balanced dog food. (More people food could upset the balance of nutrients in the commercial food).
    Can your dog eat an entirely homemade diet? Certainly, if you are willing to work at it. Any homemade diet will have to be carefully balanced, with all the right nutrients in just the right amounts. It requires a lot of research to make a proper homemade diet, but it can be done. It’s best to work with a veterinary nutritionist.


    There are many resources now available to English Bulldog owners who wish to feed a homemade diet. Just make sure the diet is complete and contains all the nutrients your English Bulldog needs. Keep a line of communication open with your veterinarian so that they can monitor your dog’s continued good health.


    Tags: English+Bulldog+Homemade+Diets, English+Bulldog
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    Aug
    28
    2011
    English Bulldog – Commercial Dog Foods
    Posted by admins in Feeding Your English Bulldog
    Dog food sales in the United States are a huge business with tremendous com-petition among manufacturers. English Bulldog owners should understand that as a big business, the goals of these companies include making a profit. Although adver-tising may show a dog and owner in a warm and fuzzy, heart-tugging moment, the nutrition your dog might get from the food being advertised has nothing to do with that heart-tugging moment. It’s all about getting you to buy the food.


    Reading English Bulldog Food Labels
    Dog food labels are not always easy to read, but if you know what to look for, they can tell you a lot about what your dog is eating.
    - The label should have a statement saying the dog food meets or exceeds the American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) nutritional guidelines. If the dog food doesn’t meet AAFCO guidelines, it can’t be considered complete and balanced, and can cause nutritional deficiencies.
    - The guaranteed analysis lists the minimum percentages of crude protein and crude fat and the maximum percentages of crude fiber and water. AAFCO requires a minimum of 18 percent crude protein for adult dogs and 22% crude protein for puppies on a dry matter basis (that means with the water removed; canned foods will have less protein because they have more water). English Bulldog food must also have a minimum of 5 percent crude fat for adults and 8% crude fat for puppies.
    - The ingredients list the most common item in the food first, and so on until you get to the least common item, which is listed last.
    - Look for a dog food that lists an animal protein source first, such as chicken or poultry meal, beef or beef by-products, and that has other protein sources listed among the top five ingredients. That’s because a food that lists chicken, wheat, wheat gluten, corn, and wheat fiber as the first five ingredients has more chicken than wheat, but may not have more chicken than all the grain products put together.
    - Other ingredients may include a carbohydrate source, fat, vitamins and minerals, preservatives, fiber, and sometimes other additives purported to be healthy.
    - Some brands may add artificial colors, sugar, and fillers – all of which should be avoided.


    Read the dog food labels, check out the manufacturers’ Web sites, check the recall lists, and talk to dog food experts, including your veterinarian if they have a background in nutrition.
    A good-quality food is necessary for your Bulldog’s health. Dog foods vary in quality, from the very good to the terrible. To make sure you are using a high-quality food, read the labels on the packages. Make sure the food offers the levels of protein, carbohydrates, and fats recommended earlier in this chapter.
    Read the list of ingredients, too. If one of the first ingredients listed is by-products, be leery of the food. By-products are the parts of slaughtered animals that are not muscle meat – lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, liver, blood, bone, fatty tissue, stomach, and intestines. Dog food manufacturers can meet protein requirements by including by-products, but they are inferior forms of protein that do not metabolize as completely in the dog’s body.
    English Bulldogs do well on a dog food that uses a muscle meat as the first ingredient. Muscle meats are listed on the label simply as beef, chicken, fish, and so on. Steer away from foods with a lot of soy or soy products, as these are thought to contribute to stomach gas, which can lead to bloat.


    Tags: English+Bulldog+Commercial+Dog+Foods, English+Bulldog
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    Aug
    27
    2011
    English Bulldog – Nutritional Building Blocks (Part II)
    Posted by admins in Feeding Your English Bulldog
    Vitamins


    Vitamins are vital elements necessary for growth and the maintenance of life. There are two classes of vitamins: water-soluble and fat-soluble. Water-soluble vitamins include the B-complex vitamins and vitamin C. Fat-soluble vitamins include A, D, E and K.


    Water-Soluble Vitamins


    These vitamins are absorbed by the body during digestion using the water found in the dog’s food. Although it’s usually a good idea to allow the English Bulldog to drink water whenever she’s thirsty, additional water is not needed for digestion of these vitamins, because the water in the dog’s body is sufficient as long as the dog is not dehydrated. Excess water-soluble vitamins are excreted from the body in the urine, so it’s difficult to oversupplement these vitamins – although too much vitamin C can cause diarrhea.
    The B vitamins serve a number of functions, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids. The B vitamins are involved in many biochemical processes, and deficiencies can show up as weight loss, slow growth, dry and flaky skin, or anemia, depending on the specific deficiency. The B vitamins can be obtained from meat and dairy products, beans, and eggs.
    Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and, at the same time, a controversial vitamin. Some respected sources state that it is not a required dietary supplement for dogs, yet others regard C as a miracle vitamin. Some feel it can help prevent hip dysplasia and other potential problems, but these claims have not been proven. Dogs can produce a certain amount of vitamin C in their bodies, but this amount is often not sufficient, especially if the dog is under stress from work, injury, or illness.


    Fat-Soluble Vitamins


    These vitamins require some fats in the dog’s diet for adequate absorption. Fats are in the meat in your dog’s diet and are added to commercial dog foods. Excess fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body’s fat. Excess vitamins of this type can cause problems, including toxicity. These vitamins should be added to the diet with care.
    Vitamin A deficiencies show up as slow or retarded growth, reproductive failure, and skin and vision problems. Green and yellow vegetables are excellent sources of vitamin A, as are carrots, fish oils, and animal livers. The vegetables should be lightly cooked so that the dog can digest them.
    Vitamin D is needed for the correct absorption of calcium and phosphorus, and is necessary for the growth and development of bones and teeth and for muscle strength. Many dogs will produce a certain amount of vitamin D when exposed to sunlight; however, often that is not enough, and supplementation is needed. Balanced dog foods will generally have vitamin D in sufficient quantities.
    Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant that also works with several enzymes in the body. It has been slhown to be effective in maintaining heart health and the immune system. It is also vital to other bodily systems, including the blood, nerves, muscles, and skin.
    Vitamin K is needed for the proper clotting of blood. It is also important for healthy bones. Vitamin K is produced in the intestinal tract, and normally supple-mentation is not needed. However, if the dog is having digestion problems or is on antibiotics, supple-mentation may be required. Vitamin K can be found in dark green vegetables, including kale and spinach. These should be lightly cooked before feeding them to your English Bulldog.


    Minerals


    Minerals, like vitamins, are necessary for life and physical well-being. Minerals can affect the body in many ways. A deficiency of calcium can lead to rickets, a deficiency of manganese can cause reproductive failure, and a zinc deficiency can lead to growth retardation and skin problems.
    Many minerals are tied in with vitamins; in other words, a vitamin deficiency will also result in a mineral deficiency. For example, an adequate amount of vitamin B ensures there is also an adequate amount of cobalt because cobalt, a mineral, is a constituent of B .
    Minerals are normally added to commercial dog foods. If you’re feeding a homemade diet, it can be supplemented with a vitamin and mineral tablet to make sure the dog has sufficient minerals.


    Water


    It may seem like common sense to say that your English Bulldog will need water, but the importance of water cannot be emphasized enough. Water makes up about 70% of a dog’s weight. Water facilitates the generation of energy, the transportation of nutrients, and the disposal of wastes. Water is in the bloodstream, in the eyes, in the cerebrospinal fluid, and in the gastrointestinal tract. Water is vital to all of the body’s functions in some way. Don’t forget to clean your dog’s water bowl every day.


    Tags: English+Bulldog+Nutritional+Building+Blocks+Part+I I, English+Bulldog
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    Aug
    26
    2011
    English Bulldog – Nutritional Building Blocks (Part I)
    Posted by admins in Feeding Your English Bulldog
    Nutrition is a constantly ongoing process that starts at conception (with the mother dog’s diet) and ends only with death. Everything that is consumed becomes part of the dog’s daily nutrition, whether it’s good for her or not. In other words, anything your English Bulldog eats and digests (including snails, worms, or the kids’ peanut butter sandwich) can give her some kind of nutrition. However, what the Bulldog eats, the food’s actual digestibility, and how the dog’s body uses that food can all affect the actual nutrition gained by eating.
    Although your English Bulldog can eat many things, including a lot of materials that may not be good for her, there are some substances she must eat regularly to keep her healthy. These can be a part of the commercial dog food you feed her, part of a homemade diet, or in the supplements added to her food.


    Protein


    Proteins are a varied group of biological compounds that affect many different functions in your English Bulldog’s body, including the immune system, cell structure, and growth. As omnivores (dogs eat meat as well as some plant materials), dogs can digest protein from several sources. The most common are meats, grains, dairy products, and legumes. Recommendations vary as to how much of the dog’s diet should be protein, but in general, most nutritionists agree that a diet that contains between 20 and 40 percent quality protein is good for a dog.


    Carbohydrates


    Carbohydrates, like proteins, have many functions in the dog’s body, including serving as structural components of cells. However, the most important function is as an energy source. Carbohydrates can be obtained from many sources, including tubers (such as potatoes and sweet potatoes), plants (such as greens like broccoli and collard greens), and cereals. However, dogs do not have the necessary digestive enzymes to adequately digest all cereal grains. Therefore, the better sources of carbohydrates are tubers and noncitrus fruits, such as apples and bananas. Most experts recommend that a dog’s diet contain from 20 to 40% carbohydrates of the right kind.


    Fat


    Fats have many uses in the body. They are the most important way the body stores energy. Fats also make up some of the structural elements of cells and are vital to the absorption of several vitamins. Certain fats are also beneficial in keeping the skin and coat healthy. Fats in dog foods are found primarily in meat and dairy products. Recommended levels are from 10 to 20%.


    Tags: English+Bulldog+Nutritional+Building+Blocks, English+Bulldog
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    Aug
    25
    2011
    Feeding Your English Bulldog
    Posted by admins in Feeding Your English Bulldog
    Most Bulldogs believe everything that is chewable can be eaten. Many English Bulldogs even like fresh fruits, especially oranges and watermelon. I do not recommend that she be given these fruits freely or frequently, but every once in a while, smile, give her a small piece of watermelon and watch her chomp and enjoy. So, the problem of feeding a Bulldog isn’t finding something she will eat, but searching through the myriad brands, formulas, and consistencies to find what is best for her and readily available.
    Dog food is a lucrative business. Big sums of money are spent on advertising and developing foods that are palatable and healthy. On the practical side of the coin, the cost of these foods must be reasonable and within the reach of the average consumer.


    Tags: Feeding+Your+English+Bulldog, English+Bulldog
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    Aug
    24
    2011
    English Bulldog Crate Training
    Posted by admins in Bringing Your English Bulldog Home
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

  10. #10
    Kennel Cleaner MelanieNormansMom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    Thanks so much. I think his concern was that Norm would gain weight on it. But I can see now where I can feed a whole lot less than I have been and he should be fine. I asked what he feeds his dogs and he said Royal Canin and Science Diet. From what little I've researched, those are not good foods. The whole food issue is sooooo confusing and convoluted. I guess there are dogs out there that can and will eat any and everything and be just fine. My Jack Russell is like that. But I KNOW I don't have that luxury with a bulldog and I don't want to experiement and find out if he's the lone exception.
    So for now, I think we'll stick with the vet. Other than the food, he really seems on top of everything.

  11. #11
    Norwegian Rose Become a 4 Paw Member
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    Vikinggirl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    The problem with vets is the same as medical doctors, they not get a lot of training or studying in school regarding nutrition, it is just a small module of their study curriculum, their studies concentrate on diagnosing and treating diseases, so they aren't always knowledgable about nutrition. You have to do some researching and reading on your own, like reading food labels, asking questions , and then making an informed decision on what your comfortable with. I think if you choose a 5 or 6 star formula that is grain free and free of fillers, you will find a good food that is good for EBs. This is where Royal Canin is not a great food choice, it is a 2 or 3 Star food at best, and it has grains, corn and fillers, and is a chicken based food, all of which most EBs don't tolerate. Plus I think when vets sell a certain brand of dog food in their office, they get a kick back from the food companies that sell it to them for promoting it.
    LEARN A LESSON FROM YOUR DOG, NO MATTER WHAT LIFE BRINGS YOU, KICK SOME GRASS OVER THAT AND MOVE ON.

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    The Ultimate Sourmug Sherry's Avatar
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    Default Re: Not sure what to think now

    Quote Originally Posted by desertskybulldogs View Post
    There is a lot of controversy over protein amounts. I think a lot has to do with where the protein is coming from.

    I know if I change food to a less protein as I've tried in the past I don't get the same results. I've seen many have great success with even higher protein, and one can't argue about raw diet which is pretty much pure protein at its finest. Also you feed a lot less with this food that you would a lower protein food, so in the end are they really getting more?

    These are just random thoughts I've had over the years about protein, nothing has any concrete evidence, just my mind rambling.


    Sent from my iPhone 5 using Tapatalk

    rambling thoughts? maybe, but my thoughts' exactly also
    Life is like a box of chocolate covered

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